money market significado, money market definición | diccionario de inglés definición

Collins

money market  

     ( money markets    plural  ) A country's money market consists of all the banks and other organizations that deal with short-term loans, capital, and foreign exchange.     (BUSINESS)      n-count  
On the money markets the dollar was weaker against European currencies.     
Traducción diccionario Collins Ingles - Cobuild  
Collins
money     ( monies    plural)   ( moneys    plural  )
1       n-uncount   Money is the coins or bank notes that you use to buy things, or the sum that you have in a bank account.  
A lot of the money that you pay at the cinema goes back to the film distributors..., Players should be allowed to earn money from advertising..., ...discounts and money saving offers.     
2       n-plural   Monies is used to refer to several separate sums of money that form part of a larger amount that is received or spent.  
FORMAL   We drew up a schedule of payments for the rest of the monies owed.     
3   
    blood money  
    pocket money  
4    If you say that someone has money to burn, you mean that they have more money than they need or that they spend their money on things that you think are unnecessary.  
have money to burn      phrase   V inflects  
He was a high-earning broker with money to burn.     
5    If you are in the money, you have a lot of money to spend.  
INFORMAL  
in the money      phrase   usu v-link PHR  
If you are one of the lucky callers chosen to play, you could be in the money.     
6    If you make money, you obtain money by earning it or by making a profit.  
make money      phrase   V inflects  
...the only bit of the firm that consistently made money.     
7    If you say that you want someone to put their money where their mouth is, you want them to spend money to improve a bad situation, instead of just talking about improving it.  
put your money where your mouth is      phrase   V inflects  
The government might be obliged to put its money where its mouth is to prove its commitment.     
8    If you say that thesmart money is on a particular person or thing, you mean that people who know a lot about it think that this person will be successful, or this thing will happen.     (JOURNALISM)  
smart money      phrase  
With England not playing, the smart money was on the Germans...     
9    If you say that money talks, you mean that if someone has a lot of money, they also have a lot of power.  
money talks      phrase  
The formula in Hollywood is simple<endash>money talks.     
10    If you say that someone is throwing money at a problem, you are critical of them for trying to improve it by spending money on it, instead of doing more thoughtful and practical things to improve it.  
throw money at      phrase   V inflects, PHR n     (disapproval)    The Australian government's answer to the problem has been to throw money at it.     
11    If you say that someone is throwing good money after bad, you are critical of them for trying to improve a bad situation by spending more money on it, instead of doing more thoughtful or practical things to improve it.  
throw good money after bad      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    Further heavy intervention would be throwing good money after bad.     
12    If you get your money's worth, you get something which is worth the money that it costs or the effort you have put in.  
(get your) money's worth      phrase   PHR after v  
The fans get their money's worth.     
13   
    to be rolling in money  
    rolling  
    money for old rope  
    rope  
    to give someone a run for their money  
    run  


appearance money     
Appearance money is money paid to a famous person such as a sports star or film star for taking part in a public event.      n-uncount  
big money     
Big money is an amount of money that seems very large to you, especially money which you get easily.      n-uncount  
They began to make big money during the war.     
blood money  
1       n-uncount   If someone makes a payment of blood money to the family of someone who has been killed, they pay that person's family a sum of money as compensation.  
Defence lawyers have still not agreed to terms for payment of blood money to the victims' families.     
2       n-uncount   Blood money is money that is paid to someone for murdering someone.  
gate money     
Gate money is the total amount of money that is paid by the people who go to a sports match or other event.  
  (mainly BRIT)      n-uncount  
hush money     
If a person is paid hush money, someone gives them money not to reveal information they have which could be damaging or embarrassing.  
INFORMAL      n-uncount  
money box        ( money boxes    plural  ) A money box is a small box with an opening at the top, into which a child puts coins as a way of saving money.  
  (mainly BRIT)      n-count  
money laundering     
Money laundering is the crime of processing stolen money through a legitimate business or sending it abroad to a foreign bank, to hide the fact that the money was illegally obtained.      n-uncount  
...the largest money-laundering scandal in history.     
money-maker        ( money-makers    plural  ) , moneymaker   If you say that a business, product, or investment is a money-maker, you mean that it makes a big profit.     (BUSINESS)      n-count   (=money-spinner)  
money market        ( money markets    plural  ) A country's money market consists of all the banks and other organizations that deal with short-term loans, capital, and foreign exchange.     (BUSINESS)      n-count  
On the money markets the dollar was weaker against European currencies.     
money order        ( money orders    plural  ) A money order is a piece of paper representing a sum of money which you can buy at a post office and send to someone as a way of sending them money by post.  
  (AM)      n-count  
in BRIT, use postal order     
money-spinner        ( money-spinners    plural  ) , moneyspinner   If you say that something is a money-spinner, you mean that it earns a lot of money for someone.  
INFORMAL      n-count   usu adj N   (=money-maker)  
The films have been fantastic money-spinners.     
money supply     
Themoney supply is the total amount of money in a country's economy at any one time.     (BUSINESS)      n-uncount   usu the N  
They believed that controlling the money supply would reduce inflation.     
paper money     
Paper money is money which is made of paper. Paper money is usually worth more than coins.      n-uncount  
pin money     
Pin money is small amounts of extra money that someone earns or gets in order to buy things that they want but that they do not really need.  
INFORMAL      n-uncount  
She'd do anything for a bit of pin money.     
pocket money      , pocket-money  
Pocket money is money which children are given by their parents, usually every week.  
  (mainly BRIT)      n-uncount  
We agreed to give her £6 a week pocket money.     
in AM, usually use allowance     
seed money     
Seed money is money that is given to someone to help them start a new business or project.     (BUSINESS)      n-uncount  
spending money     
Spending money is money that you have or are given to spend on personal things for pleasure, especially when you are on holiday.      n-uncount  
Jo will use her winnings as spending money on her holiday to the Costa Brava.     

Traducción diccionario Collins Ingles - Cobuild  

Collins

money  

1    ackers     (slang)   banknotes, brass     (Northern English dialect)   bread     (slang)   capital, cash, coin, currency, dibs     (slang)   dosh     (Brit. & Austral. slang)   dough     (slang)   filthy lucre     (facetious)   funds, gelt     (slang, chiefly U.S.)   green     (slang)   hard cash, legal tender, lolly     (Brit. slang)   loot     (informal)   mazuma     (slang, chiefly U.S.)   megabucks     (U.S. & Canad. slang)   moolah     (slang)   necessary     (informal)   needful     (informal)   pelf     (contemptuous)   readies     (informal)   rhino     (Brit. slang)   riches, shekels     (informal)   silver, specie, spondulicks     (slang)   the ready     (informal)   the wherewithal, tin     (slang)   wealth  
2    in the money      affluent, flush     (informal)   in clover     (informal)   loaded     (slang)   on Easy Street     (informal)   prosperous, rich, rolling     (slang)   wealthy, well-heeled     (informal)   well-off, well-to-do  
    currency  

Diccionario de inglés sinónimos  

Diccionario colaborativo     Inglés Cobuild
exp.
easily gained money
n.
eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device.
[Tech.] eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device as cell phone
o.
eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically for good and services via cyber digital device.
[Tech.] eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device as cell phone
v.
used for saying that you think someone is spending too much money on things they do not need
v.
be exactly right
[Fam.] Ex.: Her guess was right on the money.
n.
innovation paradigm that assumes firms should use external ideas and/or external paths to market in their innovation process
[Tech.];[Bus.] word coined by Henry Chesbrough, who opposes this paradigm to the closed innovation one, where all the innovation process happens within the borders of the firm.
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
n.
A prostitute who exchanges sexual favors for crack cocaine instead of money.
[Slang]
n.
money paid to someone because they have suffered injury or loss, or because they own has been damaged
[US] She received compensation from the government for the damage caused to her property.
n.
money that is paid because someone suffered from a loss of what they own (such as injury)
When you are responsible for someone's serious injury, I think you should pay compensation to that person.

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"