shock definición, shock significado | diccionario de inglés definición

Collins

shock

  
[2]  
      n  
1    a number of sheaves set on end in a field to dry  
2    a pile or stack of unthreshed corn  
      vb  
3    tr   to set up (sheaves) in shocks  
     (C14: probably of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schok shock of corn, group of sixty)  
Diccionario de inglés definición  
Collins
shock   [3]  
      n  
1    a thick bushy mass, esp. of hair  
      adj  
2    Rare   bushy; shaggy  
     (C19: perhaps from shock2)  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins
insulin reaction   , shock         
      n   the condition in a diabetic resulting from an overdose of insulin, causing a sharp drop in the blood sugar level with tremor, profuse sweating, and convulsions  
   See also       hyperinsulinism  


corn shock  
      n   a stack or bundle of bound or unbound corn piled upright for curing or drying  
culture shock  
      n     (Sociol)   the feelings of isolation, rejection, etc., experienced when one culture is brought into sudden contact with another, as when a primitive tribe is confronted by modern civilization  
electric shock  
      n   the physiological reaction, characterized by pain and muscular spasm, to the passage of an electric current through the body. It can affect the respiratory system and heart rhythm,   (Sometimes shortened to)    shock  
shell shock  
      n   loss of sight, memory, etc., resulting from psychological strain during prolonged engagement in warfare,   (Also called)    combat neurosis  
  shell-shocked      adj  
shock   [1]  
      vb  
1    to experience or cause to experience extreme horror, disgust, surprise, etc.  
the atrocities shocked us, she shocks easily     
2    to cause a state of shock in (a person)  
3    to come or cause to come into violent contact; jar  
      n  
4    a sudden and violent jarring blow or impact  
5    something that causes a sudden and violent disturbance in the emotions  
the shock of her father's death made her ill     
6      (Pathol)   a state of bodily collapse or near collapse caused by circulatory failure or sudden lowering of the blood pressure, as from severe bleeding, burns, fright, etc.  
     (C16: from Old French choc, from choquier to make violent contact with, of Germanic origin; related to Middle High German schoc)  
  shockable      adj  
  shockability      n  
shock   [2]  
      n  
1    a number of sheaves set on end in a field to dry  
2    a pile or stack of unthreshed corn  
      vb  
3    tr   to set up (sheaves) in shocks  
     (C14: probably of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schok shock of corn, group of sixty)  
shock   [3]  
      n  
1    a thick bushy mass, esp. of hair  
      adj  
2    Rare   bushy; shaggy  
     (C19: perhaps from shock2)  
shock absorber  
      n   any device designed to absorb mechanical shock, esp. one fitted to a motor vehicle to damp the recoil of the road springs  
shock-horror  
      adj  
Facetious   (esp. of newspaper headlines) sensationalistic  
shock-horror stories about the British diet     
     (C20: shock1 + horror)  
shock jock  
      n  
Informal   a radio disc jockey who is deliberately controversial or provocative  
shock therapy   , treatment  
      n   the treatment of certain psychotic conditions by injecting drugs or by passing an electric current through the brain (electroconvulsive therapy) to produce convulsions or coma  
shock troops  
      pl n   soldiers specially trained and equipped to carry out an assault  
shock tube  
      n   an apparatus in which a gas is heated to very high temperatures by means of a shock wave, usually for spectroscopic investigation of the natures and reactions of the resulting radicals and excited molecules  
shock wave  
      n   a region across which there is a rapid pressure, temperature, and density rise caused by a body moving supersonically in a gas or by a detonation,   (Often shortened to)    shock      See also       sonic boom       shock tube  
thermal shock  
      n   a fluctuation in temperature causing stress in a material. It often results in fracture, esp. in brittle materials such as ceramics  
toxic shock syndrome  
      n   a potentially fatal condition in women, characterized by fever, stomachache, a painful rash, and a drop in blood pressure, that is caused by staphylococcal blood poisoning, most commonly from a retained tampon during menstruation  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins
shock wave  
      n   a region across which there is a rapid pressure, temperature, and density rise caused by a body moving supersonically in a gas or by a detonation,   (Often shortened to)    shock             See also       sonic boom       shock tube  


corn shock  
      n   a stack or bundle of bound or unbound corn piled upright for curing or drying  
culture shock  
      n     (Sociol)   the feelings of isolation, rejection, etc., experienced when one culture is brought into sudden contact with another, as when a primitive tribe is confronted by modern civilization  
electric shock  
      n   the physiological reaction, characterized by pain and muscular spasm, to the passage of an electric current through the body. It can affect the respiratory system and heart rhythm,   (Sometimes shortened to)    shock         
shell shock  
      n   loss of sight, memory, etc., resulting from psychological strain during prolonged engagement in warfare,   (Also called)    combat neurosis  
  shell-shocked      adj  
shock   [1]  
      vb  
1    to experience or cause to experience extreme horror, disgust, surprise, etc.  
the atrocities shocked us, she shocks easily     
2    to cause a state of shock in (a person)  
3    to come or cause to come into violent contact; jar  
      n  
4    a sudden and violent jarring blow or impact  
5    something that causes a sudden and violent disturbance in the emotions  
the shock of her father's death made her ill     
6      (Pathol)   a state of bodily collapse or near collapse caused by circulatory failure or sudden lowering of the blood pressure, as from severe bleeding, burns, fright, etc.  
     (C16: from Old French choc, from choquier to make violent contact with, of Germanic origin; related to Middle High German schoc)  
  shockable      adj  
  shockability      n  
shock   [2]  
      n  
1    a number of sheaves set on end in a field to dry  
2    a pile or stack of unthreshed corn  
      vb  
3    tr   to set up (sheaves) in shocks  
     (C14: probably of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schok shock of corn, group of sixty)  
shock   [3]  
      n  
1    a thick bushy mass, esp. of hair  
      adj  
2    Rare   bushy; shaggy  
     (C19: perhaps from shock2)  
shock absorber  
      n   any device designed to absorb mechanical shock, esp. one fitted to a motor vehicle to damp the recoil of the road springs  
shock-horror  
      adj  
Facetious   (esp. of newspaper headlines) sensationalistic  
shock-horror stories about the British diet            
     (C20: shock1 + horror)  
shock jock  
      n  
Informal   a radio disc jockey who is deliberately controversial or provocative  
shock therapy   , treatment  
      n   the treatment of certain psychotic conditions by injecting drugs or by passing an electric current through the brain (electroconvulsive therapy) to produce convulsions or coma  
shock troops  
      pl n   soldiers specially trained and equipped to carry out an assault  
shock tube  
      n   an apparatus in which a gas is heated to very high temperatures by means of a shock wave, usually for spectroscopic investigation of the natures and reactions of the resulting radicals and excited molecules  
thermal shock  
      n   a fluctuation in temperature causing stress in a material. It often results in fracture, esp. in brittle materials such as ceramics  
toxic shock syndrome  
      n   a potentially fatal condition in women, characterized by fever, stomachache, a painful rash, and a drop in blood pressure, that is caused by staphylococcal blood poisoning, most commonly from a retained tampon during menstruation  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins
shock   [1]  
      vb  
1    to experience or cause to experience extreme horror, disgust, surprise, etc.  
the atrocities shocked us, she shocks easily     
2    to cause a state of shock in (a person)  
3    to come or cause to come into violent contact; jar  
      n  
4    a sudden and violent jarring blow or impact  
5    something that causes a sudden and violent disturbance in the emotions  
the shock of her father's death made her ill     
6      (Pathol)   a state of bodily collapse or near collapse caused by circulatory failure or sudden lowering of the blood pressure, as from severe bleeding, burns, fright, etc.  
     (C16: from Old French choc, from choquier to make violent contact with, of Germanic origin; related to Middle High German schoc)  
  shockable      adj  
  shockability      n  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins

shock

  

      vb  
1    agitate, appal, astound, disgust, disquiet, give (someone) a turn     (informal)   gross out     (U.S. slang)   horrify, jar, jolt, nauseate, numb, offend, outrage, paralyse, raise eyebrows, revolt, scandalize, shake, shake out of one's complacency, shake up     (informal)   sicken, stagger, stun, stupefy, traumatize, unsettle  
      n  
2    blow, bolt from the blue, bombshell, breakdown, collapse, consternation, distress, disturbance, prostration, rude awakening, state of shock, stupefaction, stupor, trauma, turn     (informal)   upset, whammy     (informal, chiefly U.S.)  
3    blow, clash, collision, encounter, impact, jarring, jolt  

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