Saint Johns bread definición, Saint Johns bread significado | diccionario de inglés definición

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Collins

carob

  

      n  
1      (Also called)    algarroba   an evergreen caesalpiniaceous Mediterranean tree, Ceratonia siliqua, with compound leaves and edible pods  
2      (Also called)    algarroba, Saint Johns bread          the long blackish sugary pod of this tree, used as a substitute for chocolate and for animal fodder  
     (C16: from Old French carobe, from Medieval Latin carrubium, from Arabic al kharrubah)  
Diccionario de inglés definición  
Collins
saint     (unstressed)  
      n  
1    a person who after death is formally recognized by a Christian Church, esp. the Roman Catholic Church, as having attained, through holy deeds or behaviour, a specially exalted place in heaven and the right to veneration  
2    a person of exceptional holiness or goodness  
3    pl     (Bible)   the collective body of those who are righteous in God's sight  
      vb  
4    tr   to canonize; recognize formally as a saint  
     (C12: from Old French, from Latin sanctus holy, from sancire to hallow)  
  saintdom      n  
  saintless      adj  
  saintlike      adj  


Latter-day Saint  
      n      a more formal name for a       Mormon  
Lytham Saint Anne's  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , Lytham St Anne's   a resort in NW England, in Lancashire on the Irish Sea. Pop.: 40866 (1991)  
Mont-Saint-Michel     (French)  
      n   a rocky islet off the coast of NW France, accessible at low tide by a causeway, in the Bay of St Michel (an inlet of the Gulf of St Malo): Benedictine abbey (966), used as a prison from the Revolution until 1863; reoccupied by Benedictine monks since 1966. Area: 1 hectare (3 acres)  
Nuits-Saint-Georges     (French)  
      n   a fine red wine produced near the town of Nuits-Saint-Georges in Burgundy  
patron saint  
      n   a saint regarded as the particular guardian of a country, church, trade, person, etc.  
Saint Agnes's Eve  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Agnes's Eve   the night of Jan. 20, when according to tradition a woman can discover the identity of her future husband by performing certain rites  
Saint Albans  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Albans   a city in SE England, in W Hertfordshire: founded in 948 a.d. around the Benedictine abbey first built in Saxon times on the site of the martyrdom (about 303 a.d.) of St Alban; present abbey built in 1077; Roman ruins. Pop.: 80376 (1991),   (Latin name)    Verulamium  
Saint Andrews  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Andrews   a city in E Scotland, in Fife on the North Sea: the oldest university in Scotland (1411); famous golf links. Pop.: 11136 (1991)  
Saint Andrew's Cross  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Andrew's Cross  
1    a diagonal cross with equal arms  
2    a white diagonal cross on a blue ground  
     (C18: so called because Saint Andrew is reputed to have been crucified on a cross of this shape)  
Saint Anthony's Cross  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Anthony's Cross      another name for       tau cross  
Saint Anthony's fire  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Anthony's fire     (Pathol)      another name for       ergotism       erysipelas  
     (C16: so named because praying to St Anthony was believed to effect a cure)  
Saint Augustine  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Augustine   a resort in NE Florida, on the Intracoastal Waterway: the oldest town in North America (1565); the northernmost outpost of the Spanish colonial empire for over 200 years. Pop.: 11692 (1990)  
Saint Austell  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Austell   a town in SW England, in S Cornwall on St Austell Bay (an inlet of the English Channel): china clay industry; administratively part of St Austell with Fowey since 1968. Pop. (with Fowey): 21622 (1991)  
Saint Bartholomew's Day Massacre  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Bartholomew's Day Massacre   the murder of Huguenots in Paris that began on Aug. 24, 1572 on the orders of Charles IX, acting under the influence of his mother Catherine de' Medici  
Saint Bernard  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Bernard   a large breed of dog with a dense red-and-white coat, formerly used as a rescue dog in mountainous areas  
     (C19: so called because they were kept by the monks of the hospice at the Great Saint Bernard Pass)  
Saint Bernard Pass  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Bernard Pass   either of two passes over the Alps: the Great St Bernard Pass 2472 m (8110 ft.) high, east of Mont Blanc between Italy and Switzerland, or the Little St Bernard Pass 2157 m (7077 ft.) high, south of Mont Blanc between Italy and France  
Saint-Brieuc     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Brieuc   a market town in NW France, near the N coast of Brittany. Pop.: 47370 (1990)  
Saint Catharines  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Catharines   an industrial city in S central Canada, in S Ontario on the Welland Canal. Pop.: 129300 (1991)  
Saint Christopher  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Christopher      another name for       Saint Kitts  
Saint Christopher-Nevis  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Christopher-Nevis      the official name of       Saint Kitts-Nevis  
Saint Clair  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Clair   Lake. a lake between SE Michigan and Ontario: linked with Lake Huron by the St Clair River and with Lake Erie by the Detroit River. Area: 1191 sq. km (460 sq. miles)  
Saint-Cloud     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Cloud   a residential suburb of Paris: former royal palace; Sèvres porcelain factory. Pop.: 28670 (1990)  
Saint Croix  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Croix   an island in the Caribbean, the largest of the Virgin Islands of the U.S.: purchased by the U.S. in 1917. Chief town: Christiansted. Pop.: 50139 (1990). Area: 207 sq. km (80 sq. miles),   (Also called)    Santa Cruz  
Saint Croix River  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Croix River   a river on the border between the northeast U.S. and SE Canada, flowing from the Chiputneticook Lakes to Passamaquoddy Bay, forming the border between Maine, U.S., and New Brunswick, Canada. Length: 121 km (75 miles)  
Saint David's  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St David's   a town in SW Wales, in Pembrokeshire: its cathedral was a place of pilgrimage in medieval times. Pop.: 1627 (1991)  
Saint-Denis     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Denis  
1    a town in N France, on the Seine: 12th-century Gothic abbey church, containing the tombs of many French monarchs; an industrial suburb of Paris. Pop.: 89988 (1990)  
2    the capital of the French overseas region of Réunion, a port on the N coast. Pop.: 207158 (1995)  
Saint Elias Mountains  
      pl n   usually abbreviated to   , St Elias Mountains   a mountain range between SE Alaska and the SW Yukon, Canada. Highest peak: Mount Logan, 6050 m (19850 ft.)  
Saint Elmo's fire  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Elmo's fire   (not in technical usage) a luminous region that sometimes appears around church spires, the masts of ships, etc. It is a corona discharge in the air caused by atmospheric electricity,   (Also called)    corposant  
     (C16: so called because it was associated with Saint Elmo (a corruption, via Sant'Ermo, of Saint Erasmus, died 303) the patron saint of Mediterranean sailors)  
Saint-Émilion     (French)  
      n   a full-bodied red wine, similar to a Burgundy, produced around the town of Saint-Émilion in Bordeaux  
Saint-Étienne     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Étienne   a town in E central France: a major producer of textiles and armaments. Pop.: 201569 (1990)  
Saint-Exupéry     (French)  
      n   Antoine de (ɑ̃twan də). 1900--44, French novelist and aviator. His novels of aviation include Vol de nuit (1931) and Terre des hommes (1939). He also wrote the fairy tale Le petit prince (1943)  
Saint Gall     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Gall  
1    a canton of NE Switzerland. Capital: St Gall. Pop.: 440744 (1995 est.). Area: 2012 sq. km (777 sq. miles)  
2    a town in NE Switzerland, capital of St Gall canton: an important educational centre in the Middle Ages. Pop.: 75541 (1994),   (German name)    Sankt Gallen  
Saint George's  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St George's   the capital of Grenada, a port in the southwest. Pop.: 4621 (1991)  
Saint George's Channel  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St George's Channel   a strait between Wales and Ireland, linking the Irish Sea with the Atlantic. Length: about 160 km (100 miles). Width: up to 145 km (90 miles)  
Saint George's Cross  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St George's Cross   a red Greek cross on a white background  
Saint George's mushroom  
      n   an edible whitish basidiomycetous fungus, Tricholoma gambosum, with a floury smell  
     (so named because it appears earlier than most fungi, around St George's day (23 April))  
Saint Gotthard  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Gotthard  
1    a range of the Lepontine Alps in SE central Switzerland  
2    a pass over the St Gotthard mountains, in S Switzerland. Height: 2114 m (6935 ft.)  
Saint Helena  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Helena   a volcanic island in the SE Atlantic, forming (with its dependencies Tristan da Cunha and Ascension) a UK Overseas Territory: discovered by the Portuguese in 1502 and annexed by England in 1651; scene of Napoleon's exile and death. Capital: Jamestown. Pop.: 5700 (1992). Area: 122 sq. km (47 sq. miles)  
Saint Helens  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Helens  
1    a town in NW England, in St Helens unitary authority, Merseyside: glass industry. Pop.: 106293 (1991)  
2    a unitary authority in NW England, in Merseyside. Pop.: 181000 (1994 est.). Area: 130 sq. km (50 sq. miles)  
3    a volcanic peak in S Washington state; it erupted in 1980 after lying dormant from 1857  
Saint Helier  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Helier   a market town and resort in the Channel Islands, on the S coast of Jersey. Pop.: 27523 (1996)  
Saint James's Palace  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St James's Palace   a palace in Pall Mall, London: residence of British monarchs from 1697 to 1837  
Saint John  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St John  
1    a port in E Canada, at the mouth of the St John River: the largest city in New Brunswick. Pop.: 90457 (1991)  
2    an island in the Caribbean, in the Virgin Islands of the U.S. Pop.: 3504 (1990). Area: 49 sq. km (19 sq. miles)  
3    Lake. a lake in Canada, in S Quebec: drained by the Saguenay River. Area: 971 sq. km (375 sq. miles)  
4    a river in E North America, rising in Maine, U.S., and flowing northeast to New Brunswick, Canada, then generally southeast to the Bay of Fundy. Length: 673 km (418 miles)  
Saint-John Perse  
      n      See (Saint-John)       Perse  
Saint John's  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St John's  
1    a port in Canada, capital of Newfoundland, on the E coast of the Avalon Peninsula. Pop.: 95770 (1991)  
2    the capital of Antigua and Barbuda: a port on the NW coast of the island of Antigua. Pop.: 21514 (1991)  
Saint John's bread  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St John's bread      another name for       carob       2  
     (C16: so called because its beans were thought to be the ``locusts'' that John the Baptist ate in the desert)  
Saint John's wort  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St John's wort   any of numerous shrubs or herbaceous plants of the temperate genus Hypericum, such as H. perforatum, having yellow flowers and glandular leaves: family Hypericaceae  
   See also       rose of Sharon       1       tutsan  
     (C15: so named because it was traditionally gathered on Saint John's Eve (June 23rd) as a protection against evil spirits)  
Saint-Just     (French)  
      n   Louis Antoine Léon de (lwi ɑ̃twan leɔ̃ də). 1767--94, French Revolutionary leader and orator. A member of the Committee of Public Safety (1793--94), he was guillotined with Robespierre  
Saint Kilda  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Kilda  
1    a group of volcanic islands in the Atlantic, in the Outer Hebrides: uninhabited since 1930; bird sanctuary  
2      (Also called)    Hirta   the main island of this group  
Saint Kitts  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Kitts   an island in the E Caribbean, in the Leeward Islands: part of the state of St Kitts-Nevis. Capital: Basseterre. Pop.: 40618 (1991). Area: 168 sq. km (65 sq. miles),   (Also called)    Saint Christopher  
Saint Kitts-Nevis  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Kitts-Nevis   an independent state in the E Caribbean; comprises the two islands of St Kitts and Nevis: with the island of Anguilla formed a colony (1882--1967) and a British associated state (1967--83); Anguilla formally separated from the group in 1983; gained full independence in 1983 as a member of the Commonwealth. Official language: English. Religion: Protestant majority. Currency: E Caribbean dollar. Capital: Basseterre. Pop.: 42300 (1998 est.). Area: 262 sq. km (101 sq. miles)  
Saint Laurent     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Laurent   a W suburb of Montreal, Canada. Pop.: 72402 (1991)  
Saint-Laurent     (French)  
      n   Yves (iv), full name Yves-Mathieu. born 1936, French couturier: popularized trousers for women for all occasions  
Saint Lawrence  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Lawrence  
1    a river in SE Canada, flowing northeast from Lake Ontario, forming part of the border between Canada and the U.S., to the Gulf of St Lawrence: commercially one of the most important rivers in the world as the easternmost link of the St Lawrence Seaway. Length: 1207 km (750 miles). Width at mouth: 145 km (90 miles)  
2    Gulf of. a deep arm of the Atlantic off the E coast of Canada between Newfoundland and the mainland coasts of Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia  
Saint Lawrence Seaway  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Lawrence Seaway   an inland waterway of North America, passing through the Great Lakes, the St Lawrence River, and connecting canals and locks: one of the most important waterways in the world. Length: 3993 km (2480 miles)  
Saint Leger  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Leger   the. an annual horse race run at Doncaster since 1776: one of the classics of the flat-racing season  
Saint Leonard  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Leonard   a N suburb of Montreal, Canada. Pop.: 82200 (latest est.)  
Saint-Lô     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Lô   a market town in NW France: a Calvinist stronghold in the 16th century. Pop.: 22819 (1990)  
Saint Louis  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Louis   a port in E Missouri, on the Mississippi River near its confluence with the Missouri: the largest city in the state; university; major industrial centre. Pop.: 351565 (1996 est.)  
Saint-Louis     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Louis   a port in NW Senegal, on an island at the mouth of the Senegal River: the first French settlement in W Africa (1689); capital of Senegal until 1958. Pop.: 179000 (1995 est.)  
Saint Lucia  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Lucia   an island state in the Caribbean, in the Windward Islands group of the Lesser Antilles: a volcanic island; gained self-government in 1967 as a British Associated State; attained full independence within the Commonwealth in 1979. Official language: English. Religion: Roman Catholic majority. Currency: E Caribbean dollar. Capital: Castries. Pop.: 151000 (1998 est.). Area: 616 sq. km (238 sq. miles)  
Saint Luke's summer  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Luke's summer   a period of unusually warm weather in the autumn  
     (referring to St Luke's feast-day, Oct. 7 in the pre-Gregorian calendar (now Oct. 18))  
Saint Martin  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Martin   an island in the E Caribbean, in the Leeward Islands: administratively divided since 1648, the north belonging to France (as a dependency of Guadeloupe) and the south belonging to the Netherlands (as part of the Netherlands Antilles); salt industry. Pop.: (French) 28518 (1990); (Dutch) 37256 (1994 est.). Areas: (French) 52 sq. km (20 sq. miles); (Dutch) 33 sq. km (13 sq. miles),   (Dutch name)    Sint Maarten  
Saint Martin's summer  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Martin's summer   a period of unusually warm weather in the late autumn, esp. early November  
     (referring to St Martin's feast-day, Oct. 31 in the pre-Gregorian calendar (now Nov. 11))  
Saint-Maur-des-Fossés     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Maur-des-Fossés   a town in N France, on the River Marne: a residential suburb of SE Paris. Pop.: 77492 (1990)  
Saint-Mihiel     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Mihiel   a village in NE France, on the River Meuse: site of a battle in World War I, in which the American army launched its first offensive in France  
Saint Moritz  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Moritz   a village in E Switzerland, in Graubünden canton in the Upper Engadine, at an altitude of 1856 m (6089 ft.): sports and tourist centre. Pop.: 5335 (1990 est.)  
Saint-Nazaire     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Nazaire   a port in NW France, at the mouth of the River Loire: German submarine base in World War II; shipbuilding. Pop.: 64,sp>812 (1990)  
Saint-Ouen     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Ouen   a town in N France, on the Seine: an industrial suburb of Paris; famous flea market. Pop.: 42611 (1990)  
Saint Paul  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Paul   a port in SE Minnesota, capital of the state, at the head of navigation of the Mississippi: now contiguous with Minneapolis (the Twin Cities). Pop.: 259606 (1996 est.)  
Saint Paul's  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Paul's   a cathedral in central London, built between 1675 and 1710 to replace an earlier cathedral destroyed during the Great Fire (1666): regarded as Wren's masterpiece  
Saint Peter's  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Peter's   the basilica of the Vatican City, built between 1506 and 1615 to replace an earlier church: the largest church in the world, 188 m (615 ft.) long, and chief pilgrimage centre of Europe; designed by many architects, notably Bramante, Raphael, Sangallo, Michelangelo, and Bernini  
Saint Petersburg  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Petersburg  
1    a city and port in Russia, on the Gulf of Finland at the mouth of the Neva River: founded by Peter the Great in 1703 and built on low-lying marshes subject to frequent flooding; capital of Russia from 1712 to 1918; a cultural and educational centre, with a university (1819); a major industrial centre, with engineering, shipbuilding, chemical, textile, and printing industries. Pop.: 4838500 (1995 est.),   (Former names)    Petrograd   1914--24  
Leningrad   1924--91  
2    a city and resort in W Florida, on Tampa Bay. Pop.: 235988 (1996 est.)  
Saint Pierre     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Pierre   a former town on the coast of the French island of Martinique, destroyed by the eruption of Mont Pelée in 1902  
Saint-Pierre     (French)  
      n   Jacques Henri Bernardin de (ʒak ɑ̃ri bɛrnardɛ̃ də). 1737--1814, French author; his work, which was greatly influenced by the writings of Rousseau, includes Voyage à l'Île de France (1773), Études de la nature (1784, 1788), and La chaumière indienne (1791)  
Saint Pierre and Miquelon     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Pierre and Miquelon   an archipelago in the Atlantic, off the S coast of Newfoundland: an overseas department of France, the only remaining French possession in North America; consists of the islands of St Pierre, with most of the population, and Miquelon, about ten times as large; fishing industries. Capital: St Pierre. Pop.: 6392 (1990). Area: 242 sq. km (94 sq. miles)  
Saint Pölten  
      n      See       Sankt Pölten  
Saint-Quentin     (French)  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St-Quentin   a town in N France, on the River Somme: textile industry. Pop.: 62085 (1990)  
Saint-Saëns     (French)  
      n   (Charles) Camille (kamij). 1835--1921, French composer, pianist, and organist. His works include the symphonic poem Danse Macabre (1874), the opera Samson and Delilah (1877), the humorous orchestral suite Carnival of Animals (1886), five symphonies, and five piano concertos  
saint's day  
      n     (Christianity)   a day in the church calendar commemorating a saint  
Saint-Simon     (French)  
      n  
1    Comte de (kɔ̃t də), title of Claude Henri de Rouvroy. 1760--1825, French social philosopher, generally regarded as the founder of French socialism. He thought society should be reorganized along industrial lines and that scientists should be the new spiritual leaders. His most important work is Nouveau Christianisme (1825)  
2    Duc de (dyk də), title of Louis de Rouvroy. 1675--1755, French soldier, statesman, and writer: his Mémoires are an outstanding account of the period 1694--1723, during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV  
Saint-Simonianism   , Saint-Simonism  
      n   the socialist system advocated by the Comte de Saint-Simon  
  Saint-Simonian      n, adj  
Saint Swithin's Day  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Swithin's Day   July 15, observed as a Church festival commemorating Saint Swithin. It is popularly supposed that if it rains on this day the rain will persist for the next 40 days  
Saint Thomas  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Thomas  
1    an island in the E Caribbean, in the Virgin Islands of the U.S. Capital: Charlotte Amalie. Pop.: 48166 (1990). Area: 83 sq. km (28 sq. miles)  
2       the former name (1921--37) of       Charlotte Amalie  
Saint Valentine's Day  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Valentine's Day   Feb. 14, the day on which valentines are exchanged, originally connected with the pagan festival of Lupercalia  
Saint Vincent  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Vincent  
1    Cape. a headland at the SW extremity of Portugal: scene of several important naval battles, notably in 1797, when the British defeated the French and Spanish  
2    Gulf. a shallow inlet of SE South Australia, to the east of the Yorke Peninsula: salt industry  
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Vincent and the Grenadines   an island state in the Caribbean, in the Windward Islands of the Lesser Antilles: comprises the island of St Vincent and the Northern Grenadines; formerly a British associated state (1969--79); gained full independence in 1979 as a member of the Commonwealth. Official language: English. Religion: Protestant majority. Currency: Caribbean dollar. Capital: Kingstown. Pop.: 113000 (1998 est.). Area: 389 sq. km (150 sq. miles)  
Saint Vitus's dance  
      n   usually abbreviated to   , St Vitus's dance     (Pathol)      a nontechnical name for       Sydenham's chorea  
     (C17: so called because sufferers traditionally prayed to Saint Vitus (3rd-century child martyr) for relief)  
Seine-Saint-Denis     (French)  
      n   a department of N central France, in Île-de-France region. Capital: Bobigny. Pop.: 1405500 (1995). Area: 236 sq. km (92 sq. miles)  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins

saint

  

Diccionario de inglés sinónimos  

Consulte también:

Saint, Saint, Saint, Saint

Diccionario colaborativo     Inglés Definiciones
id.
Used to express one's enthusiasm about a new person, or a new thing such as an idea, plan, invention or innovation
The way she goes on about him!; you'd think he was the greatest thing since sliced bread / Wow! this video game is the best thing since sliced bread!
n.
regional term for flat white bread roll, other terms are bap, batch, cob
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