i definición, i significado | diccionario de inglés definición

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i         
      symbol for   the imaginary number square root --1  


Abbas I

  

      n   called the Great. 1557--1628, shah of Persia. He greatly extended Persian territory by defeating the Uzbeks and the Ottomans  
Albert I  
      n  
1    c. 1255--1308, king of Germany (1298--1308)  
2    1875--1934, king of the Belgians (1909--34)  
3    called Albert the Bear. c. 1100--70. German military leader: first margrave of Brandenburg  
Alexander I  
      n  
1    c. 1080--1124, king of Scotland (1107--24), son of Malcolm III  
2    1777--1825, tsar of Russia (1801--25), who helped defeat Napoleon and formed the Holy Alliance (1815)  
Alexander I Island  
      n   an island of Antarctica, west of Palmer Land, in the Bellingshausen Sea. Length: about 378 km (235 miles)  
Alexius I Comnenus  
      n   1048--1118, ruler of the Byzantine Empire (1081--1118)  
Antigonus I  
      n   known as Cyclops. 382--301 b.c., Macedonian general under Alexander the Great; king of Macedon (306--301)  
Artaxerxes I  
      n   died 425 b.c., king of Persia (465--425): son of Xerxes I  
Baha'í  
      n  
1    an adherent of the Baha'í Faith  
      adj  
2    of or relating to the Baha'í Faith  
     (from Persian baha'i, literally: of glory, from baha' u'llah glory of God, from Arabic)  
Baha'í Faith   , Baha'í  
      n   a religious system founded in 1863 by Baha'ullah, based on Babism and emphasizing the value of all religions and the spiritual unity of all mankind  
  Baha′ist, Baha′ite      adj, n  
Baldwin I  
      n   1058--1118, crusader and first king of Jerusalem (1100--18), who captured Acre (1104), Beirut (1109), and Sidon (1110)  
Basil I  
      n   known as the Macedonian. died 886 a.d., Byzantine emperor (876--86): founder of the Macedonian dynasty  
Baudouin I     (French)  
      n   1930--93, king of Belgium (1951--93)  
Baybars I  
      n   1223--77, sultan of Egypt and Syria (1260--77), of the Mameluke dynasty  
b.i.d.     (in prescriptions)  
      abbrev. for   bis in die  
     (Latin: twice a day)  
Bohemond I  
      n   ?1056--?1111, prince of Antioch (1099--1111); a leader of the first crusade, he helped to capture Antioch (1098)  
Bokassa I  
      n   original name Jean Bedel Bokassa. 1921--96, president of the Central African Republic (1972--76); emperor of the renamed Central African Empire from 1976 until overthrown in 1979  
Boris I  
      n   known as Boris of Bulgaria. died 907 a.d., khan of Bulgaria. His reign saw the conversion of Bulgaria to Christianity and the birth of a national literature  
Catherine I  
      n   ?1684--1727, second wife of Peter the Great, whom she succeeded as empress of Russia (1725--27)  
Charles I  
      n  
1    title as Holy Roman Emperor of Charlemagne  
2    title as king of France of Charles II (Holy Roman Emperor)  
3    title as king of Spain of Charles V (Holy Roman Emperor)  
4    title of Charles Stuart 1600--49, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625--49); son of James I. He ruled for 11 years (1629--40) without parliament, advised by his minister Strafford, until rebellion broke out in Scotland. Conflict with the Long Parliament led to the Civil War and after his defeat at Naseby (1645) he sought refuge with the Scots (1646). He was handed over to the English army under Cromwell (1647) and executed  
5    1887--1922, emperor of Austria, and, as Charles IV, king of Hungary (1916--18). The last ruler of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, he was forced to abdicate at the end of World War I  
c.i.f.   , CIF  
      abbrev. for   cost, insurance, and freight (included in the price quoted)  
c.i.f.c.i.  
      abbrev. for   cost, insurance, freight, commission, and interest (included in the price quoted)  
Clement I  
      n   Saint, called Clement of Rome. pope (?88--?97 a.d.). Feast day: Nov. 23  
Clovis I  
      n   German name Chlodwig. ?466--511 a.d., king of the Franks (481--511), who extended the Merovingian kingdom to include most of Gaul and SW Germany  
C of I  
      abbrev. for   Church of Ireland  
Constantine I  
      n  
1    known as Constantine the Great. Latin name Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus. ?280--337 a.d., first Christian Roman emperor (306--337): moved his capital to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (330)  
2    1868--1923, king of Greece (1913--17; 1920--22): deposed (1917), recalled by a plebiscite (1920), but forced to abdicate again (1922) after defeat by the Turks  
Cosimo I     (Italian)  
      n      See (Cosimo I)       Medici  
Darius I  
      n   known as Darius the Great, surname Hystaspis. ?550--486 b.c., king of Persia (521--486), who extended the Persian empire and crushed the revolt of the Ionian city states (500). He led two expeditions against Greece but was defeated at Marathon (490)  
Dasht-i-Kavir   , Dasht-e-Kavir  
      n   a salt waste on the central plateau of Iran: a treacherous marsh beneath a salt crust,   (Also called)    Kavir Desert  
Dasht-i-Lut   , Dasht-e-Lut  
      n   a desert plateau in central and E central Iran  
David I  
      n   1084--1153, king of Scotland (1124--53) who supported his niece Matilda's claim to the English throne and unsuccessfully invaded England on her behalf  
Duncan I  
      n   died 1040, king of Scotland (1034--40); killed by Macbeth  
Edmund I  
      n   ?922--946 a.d., king of England (940--946)  
Edward I  
      n   1239--1307, king of England (1272--1307); son of Henry III. He conquered Wales (1284) but failed to subdue Scotland  
Elizabeth I  
      n   1533--1603, queen of England (1558--1603); daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. She established the Church of England (1559) and put an end to Catholic plots, notably by executing Mary Queen of Scots (1587) and defeating the Spanish Armada (1588). Her reign was notable for commercial growth, maritime expansion, and the flourishing of literature, music, and architecture  
Ethelred I   , Æthelred  
      n   died 871, king of Wessex (866--71). He led resistance to the Danish invasion of England; died following his victory at Ashdown  
Faisal I   , Feisal I  
      n   1885--1933, king of Syria (1920) and first king of Iraq (1921--33): a leader of the Arab revolt against the Turks (1916--18)  
Farouk I   , Faruk I  
      n   1920--65, last king of Egypt (1936--52). He was forced to abdicate (1952)  
Faruk I  
      n      a variant spelling of       Farouk I  
Ferdinand I  
      n  
1    known as Ferdinand the Great. ?1016--65, king of Castile (1035--65) and León (1037--65): achieved control of the Moorish kings of Saragossa, Seville, and Toledo  
2    1503--64, king of Hungary and Bohemia (1526--64); Holy Roman Emperor (1558--64), bringing years of religious warfare to an end  
3    1751--1825, king of the Two Sicilies (1816--25); king of Naples (1759--1806; 1815--25), as Ferdinand IV, being dispossessed by Napoleon (1806--15)  
4    1793--1875, king of Hungary (1830--48) and emperor of Austria (1835--48); abdicated after the Revolution of 1848 in favour of his nephew, Franz Josef I  
5    1861--1948, ruling prince of Bulgaria (1887--1908) and tsar from 1908 until his abdication in 1918  
6    1865--1927, king of Romania (1914--27); sided with the Allies in World War I  
Francis I  
      n  
1    1494--1547, king of France (1515--47). His reign was dominated by his rivalry with Emperor Charles V for the control of Italy. He was a noted patron of the arts and learning  
2    1708--65, duke of Lorraine (1729--37), grand duke of Tuscany (1737--65), and Holy Roman Emperor (1745--65). His marriage (1736) to Maria Theresa led to the War of the Austrian Succession (1740--48)  
3       title as emperor of Austria of       Francis II  
Franz Josef I     (German)  
      n   English name Francis Joseph I. 1830--1916, emperor of Austria (1848--1916) and king of Hungary (1867--1916)  
Frederick I  
      n  
1       See       Frederick Barbarossa  
2    1657--1713, first king of Prussia (1701--13); son of Frederick William  
Frederick William I  
      n   1688--1740, king of Prussia (1713--40); son of Frederick I: reformed the Prussian army  
Fuad I  
      n   original name Ahmed Fuad Pasha. 1868--1936, sultan of Egypt (1917--22) and king (1922--36)  
George I  
      n   1660--1727, first Hanoverian king of Great Britain and Ireland (1714--27) and elector of Hanover (1698--1727). His dependence in domestic affairs on his ministers led to the emergence of Walpole as the first prime minister  
Gregory I  
      n   Saint, known as Gregory the Great. ?540--604 a.d., pope (590--604), who greatly influenced the medieval Church. He strengthened papal authority by centralizing administration, tightened discipline, and revised the liturgy. He appointed Saint Augustine missionary to England. Feast day: March 12 or Sept. 3  
Gustavus I  
      n   called Gustavus Vasa. ?1496--1560, king of Sweden (1523--60). He was elected king after driving the Danes from Sweden (1520--23)  
Harald I  
      n   called Harald Fairhair. ?850--933, first king of Norway: his rule caused emigration to the British Isles  
Harold I  
      n   surname Harefoot. died 1040, king of England (1037--40); son of Canute  
Henry I  
      n  
1    known as Henry the Fowler. ?876--936 a.d., duke of Saxony (912--36) and king of Germany (919--36): founder of the Saxon dynasty (918--1024)  
2    1068--1135, king of England (1100--35) and duke of Normandy (1106--35); son of William the Conqueror: crowned in the absence of his elder brother, Robert II, duke of Normandy; conquered Normandy (1106)  
Herod Agrippa I  
      n   10 b.c.--44 a.d., king of Judaea (41--44), grandson of Herod (the Great). A friend of Caligula and Claudius, he imprisoned Saint Peter and executed Saint James  
i          , I  
      n   pl   , i's, I's, Is  
1    the ninth letter and third vowel of the modern English alphabet  
2    any of several speech sounds represented by this letter, in English as in bite or hit  
3   
a    something shaped like an I  
b    (in combination)  
an I-beam     
4    dot the i's and cross the t's   to pay meticulous attention to detail  
I   [1]  
      pron   subjective   refers to the speaker or writer  
     (C12: reduced form of Old English ic; compare Old Saxon ik, Old High German ih, Sanskrit ahám)  
I   [2]  
      symbol for  
1      (Chem)   iodine  
2      (Physics)   current  
3      (Physics)   isospin  
4      (Logic)   a particular affirmative categorial statement, such as some men are married, often symbolized as SiP  
   Compare       A       E       O   1  
     (from Latin (aff)i(rmo) I affirm)  
5   
      the roman numeral for   one  
   See       Roman numerals  
6   
      international car registration for   Italy  
i.  
      abbrev. for  
1      (Grammar)   intransitive  
2      (Dentistry)   incisor  
3      (Banking)   interest  
I.  
      abbrev. for  
1    Independence  
2    Independent  
3    Institute  
4    International  
5    Island or Isle  
-i  
      suffix forming adjectives   of or relating to a region or people, esp. of the Middle East  
Iraqi, Bangladeshi     
     (from an adjectival suffix in Semitic and in Indo-Iranian languages)  
-i-  
      connective vowel   used between elements in a compound word  
cuneiform, coniferous         Compare       -o-  
     (from Latin, stem vowel of nouns and adjectives in combination)  
I-beam  
      n   a rolled steel joist or a girder with a cross section in the form of a capital letter I  
   Compare       H-beam  
i/c  
      abbrev. for   in charge (of)  
I.Chem.E.  
      abbrev. for   Institution of Chemical Engineers  
I Ching  
      n   an ancient Chinese book of divination and a source of Confucian and Taoist philosophy. Answers to questions and advice may be obtained by referring to the text accompanying one of 64 hexagrams, selected at random,   (Also called)    Book of Changes  
I'd  
      contraction of   I had or I would  
i.e.  
      abbrev. for   id est  
     (Latin: that is (to say); in other words)  
I'll  
      contraction of   I will or I shall  
I'm  
      contraction of   I am  
I/O  
      abbrev. for   input/output  
I-pin  
      n      a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for       Yibin  
i.q.  
      abbrev. for   idem quod  
     (Latin: the same as)  
Isabella I  
      n   known as Isabella the Catholic. 1451--1504, queen of Castile (1474--1504) and, with her husband, Ferdinand V, joint ruler of Castile and Aragon (1479--1504)  
I-spy  
      n   a game in which one player specifies the initial letter of the name of an object that he can see, which the other players then try to guess  
i.t.a.   , ITA  
      abbrev. for   initial teaching alphabet, a partly phonetic alphabet used to teach reading  
i-type semiconductor  
      n      another name for       intrinsic semiconductor  
i.v.  
      abbrev. for  
1    initial velocity  
2      (Also)    IV   intravenous(ly)  
I've  
      contraction of   I have  
James I  
      n  
1    called the Conqueror. 1208--76, king of Aragon (1216--76). He captured the Balearic Islands and Valencia from the Muslims, thus beginning Aragonese expansion in the Mediterranean  
2    1394--1437, king of Scotland (1406--37), second son of Robert III  
3    1566--1625, king of England and Ireland (1603--25) and, as James VI, king of Scotland (1567--1625), in succession to Elizabeth I of England and his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, respectively. He alienated Parliament by his assertion of the divine right of kings, his favourites, esp. the Duke of Buckingham, and his subservience to Spain  
John I  
      n  
1    surnamed Tzimisces. 925--976 a.d., Byzantine emperor (969--976): extended Byzantine power into Bulgaria and Syria  
2    called the Great. 1357--1433, king of Portugal (1385--1433). He secured independence for Portugal by his victory over Castile (1385) and initiated Portuguese overseas expansion  
John Paul I  
      n   original name Albino Luciani. 1912--78, pope (1978) whose brief 33-day reign was characterized by a simpler papal style and anticipated an emphasis on pastoral rather than administrative priorities  
Justinian I  
      n   called the Great; Latin name Flavius Anicius Justinianus. 483--565 a.d., Byzantine emperor (527--565). He recovered North Africa, SE Spain, and Italy, largely owing to the brilliance of generals such as Belisarius. He sponsored the Justinian Code  
Kenneth I  
      n   surnamed MacAlpine. died 858, king of the Scots of Dalriada and of the Picts (?844--858): considered the first Scottish king  
Koh-i-noor   , Kohinor, Kohinur  
      n   a very large oval Indian diamond, part of the British crown jewels since 1849, weighing 108.8 carats  
     (C19: from Persian Koh-i-nur, literally: mountain of light, from koh mountain + Arabic nur light)  
Ladislaus I   , Ladislas  
      n   Saint. 1040--95, king of Hungary (1077--95). He extended his country's boundaries and suppressed paganism. Feast day: June 27  
Leo I  
      n   Saint, known as Leo the Great. ?390--461 a.d., pope (440--461). He extended the authority of the papacy in the West and persuaded Attila not to attack Rome (452). Feast day: Nov. 10 or Feb. 18  
Leopold I  
      n  
1    1640--1705, Holy Roman Emperor (1658--1705). His reign was marked by wars with Louis XIV of France and with the Turks  
2    1790--1865, first king of the Belgians (1831--65)  
Llewelyn I  
      n      See       Llywelyn ap Iorwerth  
Lothair I  
      n   ?795--855 a.d., Frankish ruler and Holy Roman Emperor (823--30, 833--34, 840--55); son of Louis I, whom he twice deposed from the throne  
Louis I     (French)  
      n   known as Louis the Pious or Louis the Debonair. 778--840 a.d., king of France and Holy Roman Emperor (814--23, 830--33, 834--40): he was twice deposed by his sons  
Manuel I     (Portuguese)  
      n   called the Fortunate. 1469--1521, king of Portugal (1495--1521); his reign saw the discovery of Brazil and the beginning of Portuguese trade with India and the East  
Mary I  
      n   family name Tudor, known as Bloody Mary. 1516--58, queen of England (1553--58). The daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, she married Philip II of Spain in 1554. She restored Roman Catholicism to England and about 300 Protestants were burnt at the stake as heretics  
Matthias I Corvinus  
      n   ?1440--90, king of Hungary (1458--90): built up the most powerful kingdom in Central Europe. A patron of Renaissance art, he founded the Corvina library, one of the finest in Europe,   (Hungarian name)    Mátyás Hollós  
Maximilian I  
      n   1459--1519, king of Germany (1486--1519) and Holy Roman Emperor (1493--1519)  
Mu'awiyah I  
      n   ?602--680 a.d., first caliph (661--80) of the Omayyad dynasty of Damascus; regarded as having secularized the caliphate  
Napoleon I  
      n   full name Napoleon Bonaparte. 1769--1821, Emperor of the French (1804--15). He came to power as the result of a coup in 1799 and established an extensive European empire. A brilliant general, he defeated every European coalition against him until, irreparably weakened by the Peninsular War and the Russian campaign (1812), his armies were defeated at Leipzig (1813). He went into exile but escaped and ruled as emperor during the Hundred Days. He was finally defeated at Waterloo (1815). As an administrator, his achievements were of lasting significance and include the Code Napoléon, which remains the basis of French law  
Nicholas I  
      n  
1    Saint, called the Great. died 867 a.d., Italian ecclesiastic; pope (858--867). He championed papal supremacy. Feast day: Nov. 13  
2    1796--1855, tsar of Russia (1825--55). He gained notoriety for his autocracy and his emphasis on military discipline and bureaucracy  
Olaf I   , Olav I  
      n   known as Olaf Tryggvesson. ?965--?1000 a.d., king of Norway (995--?1000). He began the conversion of Norway to Christianity  
Osman I   , Othman I  
      n   1259--1326, Turkish sultan; founder of the Ottoman Empire  
Othman I  
      n      a variant of       Osman I  
Otho I  
      n      a variant of       Otto I  
Otto I   , Otho I  
      n   called the Great. 912--73 a.d., king of Germany (936--73); Holy Roman Emperor (962--73)  
Paul I  
      n  
1    1754--1801, tsar of Russia (1796--1801); son of Catherine II; assassinated  
2    1901--64, king of the Hellenes (1947--64); son of Constantine I  
Pedro I  
      n   1798--1834, first emperor of Brazil (1822--31); son of John VI of Portugal: declared Brazilian independence (1822)  
Peter I  
      n   known as Peter the Great. 1672--1725, tsar of Russia (1682--1725), who assumed sole power in 1689. He introduced many reforms in government, technology, and the western European ideas. He also acquired new territories for Russia in the Baltic and founded the new capital of St Petersburg (1703)  
Philip I  
      n  
1    known as Philip the Handsome. 1478--1506, king of Castile (1506); father of Emperor Charles V and founder of the Hapsburg dynasty in Spain  
2    title of Philip II of Spain as king of Portugal  
p-i-n  
      abbrev. for   p-type, intrinsic, n-type: a form of construction of semiconductor devices  
Ptolemy I  
      n   called Ptolemy Soter. ?367--283 b.c., king of Egypt (323--285 b.c.), a general of Alexander the Great, who obtained Egypt on Alexander's death and founded the Ptolemaic dynasty: his capital Alexandria became the centre of Greek culture  
Richard I  
      n   nicknamed Coeur de Lion or the Lion-Heart. 1157--99, king of England (1189--99); a leader of the third crusade (joining it in 1191). On his way home, he was captured in Austria (1192) and held to ransom. After a brief return to England, where he was crowned again (1194), he spent the rest of his life in France  
Robert I  
      n   known as Robert the Bruce. 1274--1329, king of Scotland (1306--29): he defeated the English army of Edward II at Bannockburn (1314) and gained recognition of Scotland's independence (1328)  
Rudolf I   , Rudolph I  
      n   1218--91, king of Germany (1273--91): founder of the Hapsburg dynasty based on the duchies of Styria and Austria  
Seleucus I  
      n   surname Nicator. ?358--280 b.c., Macedonian general under Alexander the Great, who founded the Seleucid kingdom  
Sesostris I  
      n   20th century b.c., king of Egypt of the 12th dynasty. He conquered Nubia and brought ancient Egypt to the height of its prosperity. The funerary complex at Lisht was built during his reign  
Suleiman I   , Soliman, Solyman  
      n   called the Magnificent. ?1495--1566, sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1520--66), whose reign was noted for its military power and cultural achievements  
Suppiluliumas I  
      n   king of the Hittites (?1375--?1335 b.c.); founder of the Hittite empire  
Theodore I  
      n   called Lascaris. ?1175--1222, Byzantine ruler, who founded a Byzantine state in exile at Nicaea after Constantinople fell to the Crusaders (1204)  
Theodosius I  
      n   called the Great. ?346--395 a.d., Roman emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire (379--95) and of the Western Roman Empire (392--95)  
Thutmose I  
      n   died c. 1500 b.c., king of Egypt of the 18th dynasty, who extended his territory in Nubia and Syria and enlarged the Temple of Amon at Karnak  
t.i.d.     (in prescriptions)  
      abbrev. for   ter in die  
     (Latin: three times a day)  
Tiglath-pileser I  
      n   king of Assyria (?1116--?1093 b.c.), who extended his kingdom to the upper Euphrates and defeated the king of Babylonia  
type I error  
      n     (Statistics)   the error of rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true, the probability of which is the significance level of a result  
Umberto I     (Italian)  
      n   1844--1900, king of Italy (1878--1900); son of Victor Emmanuel II: assassinated at Monza  
Valdemar I   , II, IV     (Danish)  
      n   a variant spelling of Waldemar I, II or IV  
Valentinian I   , Valentinianus I  
      n   321--375 a.d., emperor of the Western Roman Empire (364--375); appointed his brother Valens to rule the Eastern Empire  
Waldemar I   , Valdemar I  
      n   known as Waldemar the Great. 1131--82, king of Denmark (1157--82). He conquered the Wends (1169), increased the territory of Denmark, and established the hereditary rule of his line  
Wilhelm I  
      n      the German name of       William I       5  
Wilhelmina I     (Dutch)  
      n   1880--1962, queen of the Netherlands from 1890 until her abdication (1948) in favour of her daughter Juliana  
William I  
      n  
1    known as William the Conqueror. ?1027--1087, duke of Normandy (1035--87) and king of England (1066--87). He claimed to have been promised the English crown by Edward the Confessor, after whose death he disputed the succession of Harold II, invading England in 1066 and defeating Harold at Hastings. The conquest of England resulted in the introduction to England of many Norman customs, esp. feudalism. In 1085 he ordered the Domesday Book to be compiled  
2    known as William the Bad. 1120--66, Norman king of Sicily (1154--66)  
3    known as William the Silent. 1533--84, prince of Orange and count of Nassau: led the revolt of the Netherlands against Spain (1568--76) and became first stadholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands (1579--84); assassinated  
4    1772--1843, king of the Netherlands (1815--40): abdicated in favour of his son William II  
5    German name Wilhelm I. 1797--1888, king of Prussia (1861--88) and first emperor of Germany (1871--88)  
World War I  
      n   the war (1914--18), fought mainly in Europe and the Middle East, in which the Allies (principally France, Russia, Britain, Italy after 1915, and the U.S. after 1917) defeated the Central Powers (principally Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Turkey). The war was precipitated by the assassination of Austria's crown prince (Archduke Franz Ferdinand) at Sarajevo on June 28, 1914 and swiftly developed its major front in E France, where millions died in static trench warfare. After the October Revolution (1917) the Bolsheviks ended Russian participation in the war (Dec. 15, 1917). The exhausted Central Powers agreed to an armistice on Nov. 11, 1918 and quickly succumbed to internal revolution, before being forced to sign the Treaty of Versailles (June 28, 1919) and other treaties,   (Also called)    First World War, Great War  
Wu-lu-mu-ch'i  
      n      a variant of       Urumchi  
Xerxes I  
      n   ?519--465 b.c., king of Persia (485--465), who led a vast army against Greece. His forces were victorious at Thermopylae but his fleet was defeated at Salamis (480) and his army at Plataea (479)  
Zog I  
      n   1895--1961, king of Albania (1928--39), formerly prime minister (1922--24) and president (1925--28). He allowed Albania to become dominated by Fascist Italy and fled into exile when Mussolini invaded (1939)  
Diccionario de inglés definición  
Collins
I          [1]  
      pron   subjective   refers to the speaker or writer  
     (C12: reduced form of Old English ic; compare Old Saxon ik, Old High German ih, Sanskrit ahám)  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins
I          [2]  
      symbol for  
1      (Chem)   iodine  
2      (Physics)   current  
3      (Physics)   isospin  
4      (Logic)   a particular affirmative categorial statement, such as some men are married, often symbolized as SiP  
   Compare       A       E       O   1  
     (from Latin (aff)i(rmo) I affirm)  
5   
      the roman numeral for   one  
   See       Roman numerals  
6   
      international car registration for   Italy  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins
current  
      adj  
1    of the immediate present; in progress  
current events     
2    most recent; up-to-date  
the current issue of a magazine     
3    commonly known, practised, or accepted; widespread  
a current rumour     
4    circulating and valid at present  
current coins     
      n  
5    (esp. of water or air) a steady usually natural flow  
6    a mass of air, body of water, etc., that has a steady flow in a particular direction  
7    the rate of flow of such a mass  
8      (Also called)    electric current     (Physics)  
a    a flow of electric charge through a conductor  
b    the rate of flow of this charge. It is usually measured in amperes.,   (Symbol)    I         
9    a general trend or drift  
currents of opinion     
     (C13: from Old French corant, literally: running, from corre to run, from Latin currere)  
  currently      adv  
  currentness      n  


Abbas I  
      n   called the Great. 1557--1628, shah of Persia. He greatly extended Persian territory by defeating the Uzbeks and the Ottomans  
Albert I  
      n  
1    c. 1255--1308, king of Germany (1298--1308)  
2    1875--1934, king of the Belgians (1909--34)  
3    called Albert the Bear. c. 1100--70. German military leader: first margrave of Brandenburg  
Alexander I  
      n  
1    c. 1080--1124, king of Scotland (1107--24), son of Malcolm III  
2    1777--1825, tsar of Russia (1801--25), who helped defeat Napoleon and formed the Holy Alliance (1815)  
Alexander I Island  
      n   an island of Antarctica, west of Palmer Land, in the Bellingshausen Sea. Length: about 378 km (235 miles)  
Alexius I Comnenus  
      n   1048--1118, ruler of the Byzantine Empire (1081--1118)  
Antigonus I  
      n   known as Cyclops. 382--301 b.c., Macedonian general under Alexander the Great; king of Macedon (306--301)  
Artaxerxes I  
      n   died 425 b.c., king of Persia (465--425): son of Xerxes I  
Baha'í  
      n  
1    an adherent of the Baha'í Faith  
      adj  
2    of or relating to the Baha'í Faith  
     (from Persian baha'i, literally: of glory, from baha' u'llah glory of God, from Arabic)  
Baha'í Faith   , Baha'í  
      n   a religious system founded in 1863 by Baha'ullah, based on Babism and emphasizing the value of all religions and the spiritual unity of all mankind  
  Baha′ist, Baha′ite      adj, n  
Baldwin I  
      n   1058--1118, crusader and first king of Jerusalem (1100--18), who captured Acre (1104), Beirut (1109), and Sidon (1110)  
Basil I  
      n   known as the Macedonian. died 886 a.d., Byzantine emperor (876--86): founder of the Macedonian dynasty  
Baudouin I     (French)  
      n   1930--93, king of Belgium (1951--93)  
Baybars I  
      n   1223--77, sultan of Egypt and Syria (1260--77), of the Mameluke dynasty  
b.i.d.     (in prescriptions)  
      abbrev. for   bis in die  
     (Latin: twice a day)  
Bohemond I  
      n   ?1056--?1111, prince of Antioch (1099--1111); a leader of the first crusade, he helped to capture Antioch (1098)  
Bokassa I  
      n   original name Jean Bedel Bokassa. 1921--96, president of the Central African Republic (1972--76); emperor of the renamed Central African Empire from 1976 until overthrown in 1979  
Boris I  
      n   known as Boris of Bulgaria. died 907 a.d., khan of Bulgaria. His reign saw the conversion of Bulgaria to Christianity and the birth of a national literature  
Catherine I  
      n   ?1684--1727, second wife of Peter the Great, whom she succeeded as empress of Russia (1725--27)  
Charles I  
      n  
1    title as Holy Roman Emperor of Charlemagne  
2    title as king of France of Charles II (Holy Roman Emperor)  
3    title as king of Spain of Charles V (Holy Roman Emperor)  
4    title of Charles Stuart 1600--49, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625--49); son of James I. He ruled for 11 years (1629--40) without parliament, advised by his minister Strafford, until rebellion broke out in Scotland. Conflict with the Long Parliament led to the Civil War and after his defeat at Naseby (1645) he sought refuge with the Scots (1646). He was handed over to the English army under Cromwell (1647) and executed  
5    1887--1922, emperor of Austria, and, as Charles IV, king of Hungary (1916--18). The last ruler of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, he was forced to abdicate at the end of World War I  
c.i.f.   , CIF  
      abbrev. for   cost, insurance, and freight (included in the price quoted)  
c.i.f.c.i.  
      abbrev. for   cost, insurance, freight, commission, and interest (included in the price quoted)  
Clement I  
      n   Saint, called Clement of Rome. pope (?88--?97 a.d.). Feast day: Nov. 23  
Clovis I  
      n   German name Chlodwig. ?466--511 a.d., king of the Franks (481--511), who extended the Merovingian kingdom to include most of Gaul and SW Germany  
C of I  
      abbrev. for   Church of Ireland  
Constantine I  
      n  
1    known as Constantine the Great. Latin name Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus. ?280--337 a.d., first Christian Roman emperor (306--337): moved his capital to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (330)  
2    1868--1923, king of Greece (1913--17; 1920--22): deposed (1917), recalled by a plebiscite (1920), but forced to abdicate again (1922) after defeat by the Turks  
Cosimo I     (Italian)  
      n      See (Cosimo I)       Medici  
Darius I  
      n   known as Darius the Great, surname Hystaspis. ?550--486 b.c., king of Persia (521--486), who extended the Persian empire and crushed the revolt of the Ionian city states (500). He led two expeditions against Greece but was defeated at Marathon (490)  
Dasht-i-Kavir   , Dasht-e-Kavir  
      n   a salt waste on the central plateau of Iran: a treacherous marsh beneath a salt crust,   (Also called)    Kavir Desert  
Dasht-i-Lut   , Dasht-e-Lut  
      n   a desert plateau in central and E central Iran  
David I  
      n   1084--1153, king of Scotland (1124--53) who supported his niece Matilda's claim to the English throne and unsuccessfully invaded England on her behalf  
Duncan I  
      n   died 1040, king of Scotland (1034--40); killed by Macbeth  
Edmund I  
      n   ?922--946 a.d., king of England (940--946)  
Edward I  
      n   1239--1307, king of England (1272--1307); son of Henry III. He conquered Wales (1284) but failed to subdue Scotland  
Elizabeth I  
      n   1533--1603, queen of England (1558--1603); daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. She established the Church of England (1559) and put an end to Catholic plots, notably by executing Mary Queen of Scots (1587) and defeating the Spanish Armada (1588). Her reign was notable for commercial growth, maritime expansion, and the flourishing of literature, music, and architecture  
Ethelred I   , Æthelred  
      n   died 871, king of Wessex (866--71). He led resistance to the Danish invasion of England; died following his victory at Ashdown  
Faisal I   , Feisal I  
      n   1885--1933, king of Syria (1920) and first king of Iraq (1921--33): a leader of the Arab revolt against the Turks (1916--18)  
Farouk I   , Faruk I  
      n   1920--65, last king of Egypt (1936--52). He was forced to abdicate (1952)  
Faruk I  
      n      a variant spelling of       Farouk I  
Ferdinand I  
      n  
1    known as Ferdinand the Great. ?1016--65, king of Castile (1035--65) and León (1037--65): achieved control of the Moorish kings of Saragossa, Seville, and Toledo  
2    1503--64, king of Hungary and Bohemia (1526--64); Holy Roman Emperor (1558--64), bringing years of religious warfare to an end  
3    1751--1825, king of the Two Sicilies (1816--25); king of Naples (1759--1806; 1815--25), as Ferdinand IV, being dispossessed by Napoleon (1806--15)  
4    1793--1875, king of Hungary (1830--48) and emperor of Austria (1835--48); abdicated after the Revolution of 1848 in favour of his nephew, Franz Josef I  
5    1861--1948, ruling prince of Bulgaria (1887--1908) and tsar from 1908 until his abdication in 1918  
6    1865--1927, king of Romania (1914--27); sided with the Allies in World War I  
Francis I  
      n  
1    1494--1547, king of France (1515--47). His reign was dominated by his rivalry with Emperor Charles V for the control of Italy. He was a noted patron of the arts and learning  
2    1708--65, duke of Lorraine (1729--37), grand duke of Tuscany (1737--65), and Holy Roman Emperor (1745--65). His marriage (1736) to Maria Theresa led to the War of the Austrian Succession (1740--48)  
3       title as emperor of Austria of       Francis II  
Franz Josef I     (German)  
      n   English name Francis Joseph I. 1830--1916, emperor of Austria (1848--1916) and king of Hungary (1867--1916)  
Frederick I  
      n  
1       See       Frederick Barbarossa  
2    1657--1713, first king of Prussia (1701--13); son of Frederick William  
Frederick William I  
      n   1688--1740, king of Prussia (1713--40); son of Frederick I: reformed the Prussian army  
Fuad I  
      n   original name Ahmed Fuad Pasha. 1868--1936, sultan of Egypt (1917--22) and king (1922--36)  
George I  
      n   1660--1727, first Hanoverian king of Great Britain and Ireland (1714--27) and elector of Hanover (1698--1727). His dependence in domestic affairs on his ministers led to the emergence of Walpole as the first prime minister  
Gregory I  
      n   Saint, known as Gregory the Great. ?540--604 a.d., pope (590--604), who greatly influenced the medieval Church. He strengthened papal authority by centralizing administration, tightened discipline, and revised the liturgy. He appointed Saint Augustine missionary to England. Feast day: March 12 or Sept. 3  
Gustavus I  
      n   called Gustavus Vasa. ?1496--1560, king of Sweden (1523--60). He was elected king after driving the Danes from Sweden (1520--23)  
Harald I  
      n   called Harald Fairhair. ?850--933, first king of Norway: his rule caused emigration to the British Isles  
Harold I  
      n   surname Harefoot. died 1040, king of England (1037--40); son of Canute  
Henry I  
      n  
1    known as Henry the Fowler. ?876--936 a.d., duke of Saxony (912--36) and king of Germany (919--36): founder of the Saxon dynasty (918--1024)  
2    1068--1135, king of England (1100--35) and duke of Normandy (1106--35); son of William the Conqueror: crowned in the absence of his elder brother, Robert II, duke of Normandy; conquered Normandy (1106)  
Herod Agrippa I  
      n   10 b.c.--44 a.d., king of Judaea (41--44), grandson of Herod (the Great). A friend of Caligula and Claudius, he imprisoned Saint Peter and executed Saint James  
i   , I         
      n   pl   , i's, I's, Is  
1    the ninth letter and third vowel of the modern English alphabet  
2    any of several speech sounds represented by this letter, in English as in bite or hit  
3   
a    something shaped like an I  
b    (in combination)  
an I-beam     
4    dot the i's and cross the t's   to pay meticulous attention to detail  
i  
      symbol for   the imaginary number square root --1  
I          [1]  
      pron   subjective   refers to the speaker or writer  
     (C12: reduced form of Old English ic; compare Old Saxon ik, Old High German ih, Sanskrit ahám)  
I          [2]  
      symbol for  
1      (Chem)   iodine  
2      (Physics)   current  
3      (Physics)   isospin  
4      (Logic)   a particular affirmative categorial statement, such as some men are married, often symbolized as SiP  
   Compare       A       E       O   1  
     (from Latin (aff)i(rmo) I affirm)  
5   
      the roman numeral for   one  
   See       Roman numerals  
6   
      international car registration for   Italy  
i.  
      abbrev. for  
1      (Grammar)   intransitive  
2      (Dentistry)   incisor  
3      (Banking)   interest  
I.  
      abbrev. for  
1    Independence  
2    Independent  
3    Institute  
4    International  
5    Island or Isle  
-i  
      suffix forming adjectives   of or relating to a region or people, esp. of the Middle East  
Iraqi, Bangladeshi     
     (from an adjectival suffix in Semitic and in Indo-Iranian languages)  
-i-  
      connective vowel   used between elements in a compound word  
cuneiform, coniferous         Compare       -o-  
     (from Latin, stem vowel of nouns and adjectives in combination)  
I-beam  
      n   a rolled steel joist or a girder with a cross section in the form of a capital letter I  
   Compare       H-beam  
i/c  
      abbrev. for   in charge (of)  
I.Chem.E.  
      abbrev. for   Institution of Chemical Engineers  
I Ching  
      n   an ancient Chinese book of divination and a source of Confucian and Taoist philosophy. Answers to questions and advice may be obtained by referring to the text accompanying one of 64 hexagrams, selected at random,   (Also called)    Book of Changes  
I'd  
      contraction of   I had or I would  
i.e.  
      abbrev. for   id est  
     (Latin: that is (to say); in other words)  
I'll  
      contraction of   I will or I shall  
I'm  
      contraction of   I am  
I/O  
      abbrev. for   input/output  
I-pin  
      n      a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for       Yibin  
i.q.  
      abbrev. for   idem quod  
     (Latin: the same as)  
Isabella I  
      n   known as Isabella the Catholic. 1451--1504, queen of Castile (1474--1504) and, with her husband, Ferdinand V, joint ruler of Castile and Aragon (1479--1504)  
I-spy  
      n   a game in which one player specifies the initial letter of the name of an object that he can see, which the other players then try to guess  
i.t.a.   , ITA  
      abbrev. for   initial teaching alphabet, a partly phonetic alphabet used to teach reading  
i-type semiconductor  
      n      another name for       intrinsic semiconductor  
i.v.  
      abbrev. for  
1    initial velocity  
2      (Also)    IV   intravenous(ly)  
I've  
      contraction of   I have  
James I  
      n  
1    called the Conqueror. 1208--76, king of Aragon (1216--76). He captured the Balearic Islands and Valencia from the Muslims, thus beginning Aragonese expansion in the Mediterranean  
2    1394--1437, king of Scotland (1406--37), second son of Robert III  
3    1566--1625, king of England and Ireland (1603--25) and, as James VI, king of Scotland (1567--1625), in succession to Elizabeth I of England and his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, respectively. He alienated Parliament by his assertion of the divine right of kings, his favourites, esp. the Duke of Buckingham, and his subservience to Spain  
John I  
      n  
1    surnamed Tzimisces. 925--976 a.d., Byzantine emperor (969--976): extended Byzantine power into Bulgaria and Syria  
2    called the Great. 1357--1433, king of Portugal (1385--1433). He secured independence for Portugal by his victory over Castile (1385) and initiated Portuguese overseas expansion  
John Paul I  
      n   original name Albino Luciani. 1912--78, pope (1978) whose brief 33-day reign was characterized by a simpler papal style and anticipated an emphasis on pastoral rather than administrative priorities  
Justinian I  
      n   called the Great; Latin name Flavius Anicius Justinianus. 483--565 a.d., Byzantine emperor (527--565). He recovered North Africa, SE Spain, and Italy, largely owing to the brilliance of generals such as Belisarius. He sponsored the Justinian Code  
Kenneth I  
      n   surnamed MacAlpine. died 858, king of the Scots of Dalriada and of the Picts (?844--858): considered the first Scottish king  
Koh-i-noor   , Kohinor, Kohinur  
      n   a very large oval Indian diamond, part of the British crown jewels since 1849, weighing 108.8 carats  
     (C19: from Persian Koh-i-nur, literally: mountain of light, from koh mountain + Arabic nur light)  
Ladislaus I   , Ladislas  
      n   Saint. 1040--95, king of Hungary (1077--95). He extended his country's boundaries and suppressed paganism. Feast day: June 27  
Leo I  
      n   Saint, known as Leo the Great. ?390--461 a.d., pope (440--461). He extended the authority of the papacy in the West and persuaded Attila not to attack Rome (452). Feast day: Nov. 10 or Feb. 18  
Leopold I  
      n  
1    1640--1705, Holy Roman Emperor (1658--1705). His reign was marked by wars with Louis XIV of France and with the Turks  
2    1790--1865, first king of the Belgians (1831--65)  
Llewelyn I  
      n      See       Llywelyn ap Iorwerth  
Lothair I  
      n   ?795--855 a.d., Frankish ruler and Holy Roman Emperor (823--30, 833--34, 840--55); son of Louis I, whom he twice deposed from the throne  
Louis I     (French)  
      n   known as Louis the Pious or Louis the Debonair. 778--840 a.d., king of France and Holy Roman Emperor (814--23, 830--33, 834--40): he was twice deposed by his sons  
Manuel I     (Portuguese)  
      n   called the Fortunate. 1469--1521, king of Portugal (1495--1521); his reign saw the discovery of Brazil and the beginning of Portuguese trade with India and the East  
Mary I  
      n   family name Tudor, known as Bloody Mary. 1516--58, queen of England (1553--58). The daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, she married Philip II of Spain in 1554. She restored Roman Catholicism to England and about 300 Protestants were burnt at the stake as heretics  
Matthias I Corvinus  
      n   ?1440--90, king of Hungary (1458--90): built up the most powerful kingdom in Central Europe. A patron of Renaissance art, he founded the Corvina library, one of the finest in Europe,   (Hungarian name)    Mátyás Hollós  
Maximilian I  
      n   1459--1519, king of Germany (1486--1519) and Holy Roman Emperor (1493--1519)  
Mu'awiyah I  
      n   ?602--680 a.d., first caliph (661--80) of the Omayyad dynasty of Damascus; regarded as having secularized the caliphate  
Napoleon I  
      n   full name Napoleon Bonaparte. 1769--1821, Emperor of the French (1804--15). He came to power as the result of a coup in 1799 and established an extensive European empire. A brilliant general, he defeated every European coalition against him until, irreparably weakened by the Peninsular War and the Russian campaign (1812), his armies were defeated at Leipzig (1813). He went into exile but escaped and ruled as emperor during the Hundred Days. He was finally defeated at Waterloo (1815). As an administrator, his achievements were of lasting significance and include the Code Napoléon, which remains the basis of French law  
Nicholas I  
      n  
1    Saint, called the Great. died 867 a.d., Italian ecclesiastic; pope (858--867). He championed papal supremacy. Feast day: Nov. 13  
2    1796--1855, tsar of Russia (1825--55). He gained notoriety for his autocracy and his emphasis on military discipline and bureaucracy  
Olaf I   , Olav I  
      n   known as Olaf Tryggvesson. ?965--?1000 a.d., king of Norway (995--?1000). He began the conversion of Norway to Christianity  
Osman I   , Othman I  
      n   1259--1326, Turkish sultan; founder of the Ottoman Empire  
Othman I  
      n      a variant of       Osman I  
Otho I  
      n      a variant of       Otto I  
Otto I   , Otho I  
      n   called the Great. 912--73 a.d., king of Germany (936--73); Holy Roman Emperor (962--73)  
Paul I  
      n  
1    1754--1801, tsar of Russia (1796--1801); son of Catherine II; assassinated  
2    1901--64, king of the Hellenes (1947--64); son of Constantine I  
Pedro I  
      n   1798--1834, first emperor of Brazil (1822--31); son of John VI of Portugal: declared Brazilian independence (1822)  
Peter I  
      n   known as Peter the Great. 1672--1725, tsar of Russia (1682--1725), who assumed sole power in 1689. He introduced many reforms in government, technology, and the western European ideas. He also acquired new territories for Russia in the Baltic and founded the new capital of St Petersburg (1703)  
Philip I  
      n  
1    known as Philip the Handsome. 1478--1506, king of Castile (1506); father of Emperor Charles V and founder of the Hapsburg dynasty in Spain  
2    title of Philip II of Spain as king of Portugal  
p-i-n  
      abbrev. for   p-type, intrinsic, n-type: a form of construction of semiconductor devices  
Ptolemy I  
      n   called Ptolemy Soter. ?367--283 b.c., king of Egypt (323--285 b.c.), a general of Alexander the Great, who obtained Egypt on Alexander's death and founded the Ptolemaic dynasty: his capital Alexandria became the centre of Greek culture  
Richard I  
      n   nicknamed Coeur de Lion or the Lion-Heart. 1157--99, king of England (1189--99); a leader of the third crusade (joining it in 1191). On his way home, he was captured in Austria (1192) and held to ransom. After a brief return to England, where he was crowned again (1194), he spent the rest of his life in France  
Robert I  
      n   known as Robert the Bruce. 1274--1329, king of Scotland (1306--29): he defeated the English army of Edward II at Bannockburn (1314) and gained recognition of Scotland's independence (1328)  
Rudolf I   , Rudolph I  
      n   1218--91, king of Germany (1273--91): founder of the Hapsburg dynasty based on the duchies of Styria and Austria  
Seleucus I  
      n   surname Nicator. ?358--280 b.c., Macedonian general under Alexander the Great, who founded the Seleucid kingdom  
Sesostris I  
      n   20th century b.c., king of Egypt of the 12th dynasty. He conquered Nubia and brought ancient Egypt to the height of its prosperity. The funerary complex at Lisht was built during his reign  
Suleiman I   , Soliman, Solyman  
      n   called the Magnificent. ?1495--1566, sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1520--66), whose reign was noted for its military power and cultural achievements  
Suppiluliumas I  
      n   king of the Hittites (?1375--?1335 b.c.); founder of the Hittite empire  
Theodore I  
      n   called Lascaris. ?1175--1222, Byzantine ruler, who founded a Byzantine state in exile at Nicaea after Constantinople fell to the Crusaders (1204)  
Theodosius I  
      n   called the Great. ?346--395 a.d., Roman emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire (379--95) and of the Western Roman Empire (392--95)  
Thutmose I  
      n   died c. 1500 b.c., king of Egypt of the 18th dynasty, who extended his territory in Nubia and Syria and enlarged the Temple of Amon at Karnak  
t.i.d.     (in prescriptions)  
      abbrev. for   ter in die  
     (Latin: three times a day)  
Tiglath-pileser I  
      n   king of Assyria (?1116--?1093 b.c.), who extended his kingdom to the upper Euphrates and defeated the king of Babylonia  
type I error  
      n     (Statistics)   the error of rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true, the probability of which is the significance level of a result  
Umberto I     (Italian)  
      n   1844--1900, king of Italy (1878--1900); son of Victor Emmanuel II: assassinated at Monza  
Valdemar I   , II, IV     (Danish)  
      n   a variant spelling of Waldemar I, II or IV  
Valentinian I   , Valentinianus I  
      n   321--375 a.d., emperor of the Western Roman Empire (364--375); appointed his brother Valens to rule the Eastern Empire  
Waldemar I   , Valdemar I  
      n   known as Waldemar the Great. 1131--82, king of Denmark (1157--82). He conquered the Wends (1169), increased the territory of Denmark, and established the hereditary rule of his line  
Wilhelm I  
      n      the German name of       William I       5  
Wilhelmina I     (Dutch)  
      n   1880--1962, queen of the Netherlands from 1890 until her abdication (1948) in favour of her daughter Juliana  
William I  
      n  
1    known as William the Conqueror. ?1027--1087, duke of Normandy (1035--87) and king of England (1066--87). He claimed to have been promised the English crown by Edward the Confessor, after whose death he disputed the succession of Harold II, invading England in 1066 and defeating Harold at Hastings. The conquest of England resulted in the introduction to England of many Norman customs, esp. feudalism. In 1085 he ordered the Domesday Book to be compiled  
2    known as William the Bad. 1120--66, Norman king of Sicily (1154--66)  
3    known as William the Silent. 1533--84, prince of Orange and count of Nassau: led the revolt of the Netherlands against Spain (1568--76) and became first stadholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands (1579--84); assassinated  
4    1772--1843, king of the Netherlands (1815--40): abdicated in favour of his son William II  
5    German name Wilhelm I. 1797--1888, king of Prussia (1861--88) and first emperor of Germany (1871--88)  
World War I  
      n   the war (1914--18), fought mainly in Europe and the Middle East, in which the Allies (principally France, Russia, Britain, Italy after 1915, and the U.S. after 1917) defeated the Central Powers (principally Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Turkey). The war was precipitated by the assassination of Austria's crown prince (Archduke Franz Ferdinand) at Sarajevo on June 28, 1914 and swiftly developed its major front in E France, where millions died in static trench warfare. After the October Revolution (1917) the Bolsheviks ended Russian participation in the war (Dec. 15, 1917). The exhausted Central Powers agreed to an armistice on Nov. 11, 1918 and quickly succumbed to internal revolution, before being forced to sign the Treaty of Versailles (June 28, 1919) and other treaties,   (Also called)    First World War, Great War  
Wu-lu-mu-ch'i  
      n      a variant of       Urumchi  
Xerxes I  
      n   ?519--465 b.c., king of Persia (485--465), who led a vast army against Greece. His forces were victorious at Thermopylae but his fleet was defeated at Salamis (480) and his army at Plataea (479)  
Zog I  
      n   1895--1961, king of Albania (1928--39), formerly prime minister (1922--24) and president (1925--28). He allowed Albania to become dominated by Fascist Italy and fled into exile when Mussolini invaded (1939)  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Collins
i   , I         
      n   pl   , i's, I's, Is  
1    the ninth letter and third vowel of the modern English alphabet  
2    any of several speech sounds represented by this letter, in English as in bite or hit  
3   
a    something shaped like an I  
b    (in combination)  
an I-beam     
4    dot the i's and cross the t's   to pay meticulous attention to detail  


Abbas I  
      n   called the Great. 1557--1628, shah of Persia. He greatly extended Persian territory by defeating the Uzbeks and the Ottomans  
Albert I  
      n  
1    c. 1255--1308, king of Germany (1298--1308)  
2    1875--1934, king of the Belgians (1909--34)  
3    called Albert the Bear. c. 1100--70. German military leader: first margrave of Brandenburg  
Alexander I  
      n  
1    c. 1080--1124, king of Scotland (1107--24), son of Malcolm III  
2    1777--1825, tsar of Russia (1801--25), who helped defeat Napoleon and formed the Holy Alliance (1815)  
Alexander I Island  
      n   an island of Antarctica, west of Palmer Land, in the Bellingshausen Sea. Length: about 378 km (235 miles)  
Alexius I Comnenus  
      n   1048--1118, ruler of the Byzantine Empire (1081--1118)  
Antigonus I  
      n   known as Cyclops. 382--301 b.c., Macedonian general under Alexander the Great; king of Macedon (306--301)  
Artaxerxes I  
      n   died 425 b.c., king of Persia (465--425): son of Xerxes I  
Baha'í  
      n  
1    an adherent of the Baha'í Faith  
      adj  
2    of or relating to the Baha'í Faith  
     (from Persian baha'i, literally: of glory, from baha' u'llah glory of God, from Arabic)  
Baha'í Faith   , Baha'í  
      n   a religious system founded in 1863 by Baha'ullah, based on Babism and emphasizing the value of all religions and the spiritual unity of all mankind  
  Baha′ist, Baha′ite      adj, n  
Baldwin I  
      n   1058--1118, crusader and first king of Jerusalem (1100--18), who captured Acre (1104), Beirut (1109), and Sidon (1110)  
Basil I  
      n   known as the Macedonian. died 886 a.d., Byzantine emperor (876--86): founder of the Macedonian dynasty  
Baudouin I     (French)  
      n   1930--93, king of Belgium (1951--93)  
Baybars I  
      n   1223--77, sultan of Egypt and Syria (1260--77), of the Mameluke dynasty  
b.i.d.     (in prescriptions)  
      abbrev. for   bis in die  
     (Latin: twice a day)  
Bohemond I  
      n   ?1056--?1111, prince of Antioch (1099--1111); a leader of the first crusade, he helped to capture Antioch (1098)  
Bokassa I  
      n   original name Jean Bedel Bokassa. 1921--96, president of the Central African Republic (1972--76); emperor of the renamed Central African Empire from 1976 until overthrown in 1979  
Boris I  
      n   known as Boris of Bulgaria. died 907 a.d., khan of Bulgaria. His reign saw the conversion of Bulgaria to Christianity and the birth of a national literature  
Catherine I  
      n   ?1684--1727, second wife of Peter the Great, whom she succeeded as empress of Russia (1725--27)  
Charles I  
      n  
1    title as Holy Roman Emperor of Charlemagne  
2    title as king of France of Charles II (Holy Roman Emperor)  
3    title as king of Spain of Charles V (Holy Roman Emperor)  
4    title of Charles Stuart 1600--49, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625--49); son of James I. He ruled for 11 years (1629--40) without parliament, advised by his minister Strafford, until rebellion broke out in Scotland. Conflict with the Long Parliament led to the Civil War and after his defeat at Naseby (1645) he sought refuge with the Scots (1646). He was handed over to the English army under Cromwell (1647) and executed  
5    1887--1922, emperor of Austria, and, as Charles IV, king of Hungary (1916--18). The last ruler of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, he was forced to abdicate at the end of World War I  
c.i.f.   , CIF  
      abbrev. for   cost, insurance, and freight (included in the price quoted)  
c.i.f.c.i.  
      abbrev. for   cost, insurance, freight, commission, and interest (included in the price quoted)  
Clement I  
      n   Saint, called Clement of Rome. pope (?88--?97 a.d.). Feast day: Nov. 23  
Clovis I  
      n   German name Chlodwig. ?466--511 a.d., king of the Franks (481--511), who extended the Merovingian kingdom to include most of Gaul and SW Germany  
C of I  
      abbrev. for   Church of Ireland  
Constantine I  
      n  
1    known as Constantine the Great. Latin name Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus. ?280--337 a.d., first Christian Roman emperor (306--337): moved his capital to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (330)  
2    1868--1923, king of Greece (1913--17; 1920--22): deposed (1917), recalled by a plebiscite (1920), but forced to abdicate again (1922) after defeat by the Turks  
Cosimo I     (Italian)  
      n      See (Cosimo I)       Medici  
Darius I  
      n   known as Darius the Great, surname Hystaspis. ?550--486 b.c., king of Persia (521--486), who extended the Persian empire and crushed the revolt of the Ionian city states (500). He led two expeditions against Greece but was defeated at Marathon (490)  
Dasht-i-Kavir   , Dasht-e-Kavir  
      n   a salt waste on the central plateau of Iran: a treacherous marsh beneath a salt crust,   (Also called)    Kavir Desert  
Dasht-i-Lut   , Dasht-e-Lut  
      n   a desert plateau in central and E central Iran  
David I  
      n   1084--1153, king of Scotland (1124--53) who supported his niece Matilda's claim to the English throne and unsuccessfully invaded England on her behalf  
Duncan I  
      n   died 1040, king of Scotland (1034--40); killed by Macbeth  
Edmund I  
      n   ?922--946 a.d., king of England (940--946)  
Edward I  
      n   1239--1307, king of England (1272--1307); son of Henry III. He conquered Wales (1284) but failed to subdue Scotland  
Elizabeth I  
      n   1533--1603, queen of England (1558--1603); daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. She established the Church of England (1559) and put an end to Catholic plots, notably by executing Mary Queen of Scots (1587) and defeating the Spanish Armada (1588). Her reign was notable for commercial growth, maritime expansion, and the flourishing of literature, music, and architecture  
Ethelred I   , Æthelred  
      n   died 871, king of Wessex (866--71). He led resistance to the Danish invasion of England; died following his victory at Ashdown  
Faisal I   , Feisal I         
      n   1885--1933, king of Syria (1920) and first king of Iraq (1921--33): a leader of the Arab revolt against the Turks (1916--18)  
Farouk I   , Faruk I         
      n   1920--65, last king of Egypt (1936--52). He was forced to abdicate (1952)  
Faruk I  
      n      a variant spelling of       Farouk I  
Ferdinand I  
      n  
1    known as Ferdinand the Great. ?1016--65, king of Castile (1035--65) and León (1037--65): achieved control of the Moorish kings of Saragossa, Seville, and Toledo  
2    1503--64, king of Hungary and Bohemia (1526--64); Holy Roman Emperor (1558--64), bringing years of religious warfare to an end  
3    1751--1825, king of the Two Sicilies (1816--25); king of Naples (1759--1806; 1815--25), as Ferdinand IV, being dispossessed by Napoleon (1806--15)  
4    1793--1875, king of Hungary (1830--48) and emperor of Austria (1835--48); abdicated after the Revolution of 1848 in favour of his nephew, Franz Josef I  
5    1861--1948, ruling prince of Bulgaria (1887--1908) and tsar from 1908 until his abdication in 1918  
6    1865--1927, king of Romania (1914--27); sided with the Allies in World War I  
Francis I  
      n  
1    1494--1547, king of France (1515--47). His reign was dominated by his rivalry with Emperor Charles V for the control of Italy. He was a noted patron of the arts and learning  
2    1708--65, duke of Lorraine (1729--37), grand duke of Tuscany (1737--65), and Holy Roman Emperor (1745--65). His marriage (1736) to Maria Theresa led to the War of the Austrian Succession (1740--48)  
3       title as emperor of Austria of       Francis II  
Franz Josef I     (German)  
      n   English name Francis Joseph I. 1830--1916, emperor of Austria (1848--1916) and king of Hungary (1867--1916)  
Frederick I  
      n  
1       See       Frederick Barbarossa  
2    1657--1713, first king of Prussia (1701--13); son of Frederick William  
Frederick William I  
      n   1688--1740, king of Prussia (1713--40); son of Frederick I: reformed the Prussian army  
Fuad I  
      n   original name Ahmed Fuad Pasha. 1868--1936, sultan of Egypt (1917--22) and king (1922--36)  
George I  
      n   1660--1727, first Hanoverian king of Great Britain and Ireland (1714--27) and elector of Hanover (1698--1727). His dependence in domestic affairs on his ministers led to the emergence of Walpole as the first prime minister  
Gregory I  
      n   Saint, known as Gregory the Great. ?540--604 a.d., pope (590--604), who greatly influenced the medieval Church. He strengthened papal authority by centralizing administration, tightened discipline, and revised the liturgy. He appointed Saint Augustine missionary to England. Feast day: March 12 or Sept. 3  
Gustavus I  
      n   called Gustavus Vasa. ?1496--1560, king of Sweden (1523--60). He was elected king after driving the Danes from Sweden (1520--23)  
Harald I  
      n   called Harald Fairhair. ?850--933, first king of Norway: his rule caused emigration to the British Isles  
Harold I  
      n   surname Harefoot. died 1040, king of England (1037--40); son of Canute  
Henry I  
      n  
1    known as Henry the Fowler. ?876--936 a.d., duke of Saxony (912--36) and king of Germany (919--36): founder of the Saxon dynasty (918--1024)  
2    1068--1135, king of England (1100--35) and duke of Normandy (1106--35); son of William the Conqueror: crowned in the absence of his elder brother, Robert II, duke of Normandy; conquered Normandy (1106)  
Herod Agrippa I  
      n   10 b.c.--44 a.d., king of Judaea (41--44), grandson of Herod (the Great). A friend of Caligula and Claudius, he imprisoned Saint Peter and executed Saint James  
i  
      symbol for   the imaginary number square root --1  
I          [1]  
      pron   subjective   refers to the speaker or writer  
     (C12: reduced form of Old English ic; compare Old Saxon ik, Old High German ih, Sanskrit ahám)  
I          [2]  
      symbol for  
1      (Chem)   iodine  
2      (Physics)   current  
3      (Physics)   isospin  
4      (Logic)   a particular affirmative categorial statement, such as some men are married, often symbolized as SiP  
   Compare       A       E       O   1  
     (from Latin (aff)i(rmo) I affirm)  
5   
      the roman numeral for   one  
   See       Roman numerals  
6   
      international car registration for   Italy  
i.  
      abbrev. for  
1      (Grammar)   intransitive  
2      (Dentistry)   incisor  
3      (Banking)   interest  
I.  
      abbrev. for  
1    Independence  
2    Independent  
3    Institute  
4    International  
5    Island or Isle  
-i  
      suffix forming adjectives   of or relating to a region or people, esp. of the Middle East  
Iraqi, Bangladeshi     
     (from an adjectival suffix in Semitic and in Indo-Iranian languages)  
-i-  
      connective vowel   used between elements in a compound word  
cuneiform, coniferous         Compare       -o-  
     (from Latin, stem vowel of nouns and adjectives in combination)  
I-beam  
      n   a rolled steel joist or a girder with a cross section in the form of a capital letter I  
   Compare       H-beam  
i/c  
      abbrev. for   in charge (of)  
I.Chem.E.  
      abbrev. for   Institution of Chemical Engineers  
I Ching  
      n   an ancient Chinese book of divination and a source of Confucian and Taoist philosophy. Answers to questions and advice may be obtained by referring to the text accompanying one of 64 hexagrams, selected at random,   (Also called)    Book of Changes  
I'd  
      contraction of   I had or I would  
i.e.  
      abbrev. for   id est  
     (Latin: that is (to say); in other words)  
I'll  
      contraction of   I will or I shall  
I'm  
      contraction of   I am  
I/O  
      abbrev. for   input/output  
I-pin  
      n      a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for       Yibin  
i.q.  
      abbrev. for   idem quod  
     (Latin: the same as)  
Isabella I  
      n   known as Isabella the Catholic. 1451--1504, queen of Castile (1474--1504) and, with her husband, Ferdinand V, joint ruler of Castile and Aragon (1479--1504)  
I-spy  
      n   a game in which one player specifies the initial letter of the name of an object that he can see, which the other players then try to guess  
i.t.a.   , ITA  
      abbrev. for   initial teaching alphabet, a partly phonetic alphabet used to teach reading  
i-type semiconductor  
      n      another name for       intrinsic semiconductor  
i.v.  
      abbrev. for  
1    initial velocity  
2      (Also)    IV   intravenous(ly)  
I've  
      contraction of   I have  
James I  
      n  
1    called the Conqueror. 1208--76, king of Aragon (1216--76). He captured the Balearic Islands and Valencia from the Muslims, thus beginning Aragonese expansion in the Mediterranean  
2    1394--1437, king of Scotland (1406--37), second son of Robert III  
3    1566--1625, king of England and Ireland (1603--25) and, as James VI, king of Scotland (1567--1625), in succession to Elizabeth I of England and his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, respectively. He alienated Parliament by his assertion of the divine right of kings, his favourites, esp. the Duke of Buckingham, and his subservience to Spain  
John I  
      n  
1    surnamed Tzimisces. 925--976 a.d., Byzantine emperor (969--976): extended Byzantine power into Bulgaria and Syria  
2    called the Great. 1357--1433, king of Portugal (1385--1433). He secured independence for Portugal by his victory over Castile (1385) and initiated Portuguese overseas expansion  
John Paul I  
      n   original name Albino Luciani. 1912--78, pope (1978) whose brief 33-day reign was characterized by a simpler papal style and anticipated an emphasis on pastoral rather than administrative priorities  
Justinian I  
      n   called the Great; Latin name Flavius Anicius Justinianus. 483--565 a.d., Byzantine emperor (527--565). He recovered North Africa, SE Spain, and Italy, largely owing to the brilliance of generals such as Belisarius. He sponsored the Justinian Code  
Kenneth I  
      n   surnamed MacAlpine. died 858, king of the Scots of Dalriada and of the Picts (?844--858): considered the first Scottish king  
Koh-i-noor   , Kohinor, Kohinur  
      n   a very large oval Indian diamond, part of the British crown jewels since 1849, weighing 108.8 carats  
     (C19: from Persian Koh-i-nur, literally: mountain of light, from koh mountain + Arabic nur light)  
Ladislaus I   , Ladislas  
      n   Saint. 1040--95, king of Hungary (1077--95). He extended his country's boundaries and suppressed paganism. Feast day: June 27  
Leo I  
      n   Saint, known as Leo the Great. ?390--461 a.d., pope (440--461). He extended the authority of the papacy in the West and persuaded Attila not to attack Rome (452). Feast day: Nov. 10 or Feb. 18  
Leopold I  
      n  
1    1640--1705, Holy Roman Emperor (1658--1705). His reign was marked by wars with Louis XIV of France and with the Turks  
2    1790--1865, first king of the Belgians (1831--65)  
Llewelyn I  
      n      See       Llywelyn ap Iorwerth  
Lothair I  
      n   ?795--855 a.d., Frankish ruler and Holy Roman Emperor (823--30, 833--34, 840--55); son of Louis I, whom he twice deposed from the throne  
Louis I     (French)  
      n   known as Louis the Pious or Louis the Debonair. 778--840 a.d., king of France and Holy Roman Emperor (814--23, 830--33, 834--40): he was twice deposed by his sons  
Manuel I     (Portuguese)  
      n   called the Fortunate. 1469--1521, king of Portugal (1495--1521); his reign saw the discovery of Brazil and the beginning of Portuguese trade with India and the East  
Mary I  
      n   family name Tudor, known as Bloody Mary. 1516--58, queen of England (1553--58). The daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, she married Philip II of Spain in 1554. She restored Roman Catholicism to England and about 300 Protestants were burnt at the stake as heretics  
Matthias I Corvinus  
      n   ?1440--90, king of Hungary (1458--90): built up the most powerful kingdom in Central Europe. A patron of Renaissance art, he founded the Corvina library, one of the finest in Europe,   (Hungarian name)    Mátyás Hollós  
Maximilian I  
      n   1459--1519, king of Germany (1486--1519) and Holy Roman Emperor (1493--1519)  
Mu'awiyah I  
      n   ?602--680 a.d., first caliph (661--80) of the Omayyad dynasty of Damascus; regarded as having secularized the caliphate  
Napoleon I  
      n   full name Napoleon Bonaparte. 1769--1821, Emperor of the French (1804--15). He came to power as the result of a coup in 1799 and established an extensive European empire. A brilliant general, he defeated every European coalition against him until, irreparably weakened by the Peninsular War and the Russian campaign (1812), his armies were defeated at Leipzig (1813). He went into exile but escaped and ruled as emperor during the Hundred Days. He was finally defeated at Waterloo (1815). As an administrator, his achievements were of lasting significance and include the Code Napoléon, which remains the basis of French law  
Nicholas I  
      n  
1    Saint, called the Great. died 867 a.d., Italian ecclesiastic; pope (858--867). He championed papal supremacy. Feast day: Nov. 13  
2    1796--1855, tsar of Russia (1825--55). He gained notoriety for his autocracy and his emphasis on military discipline and bureaucracy  
Olaf I   , Olav I  
      n   known as Olaf Tryggvesson. ?965--?1000 a.d., king of Norway (995--?1000). He began the conversion of Norway to Christianity  
Osman I   , Othman I  
      n   1259--1326, Turkish sultan; founder of the Ottoman Empire  
Othman I  
      n      a variant of       Osman I  
Otho I  
      n      a variant of       Otto I  
Otto I   , Otho I  
      n   called the Great. 912--73 a.d., king of Germany (936--73); Holy Roman Emperor (962--73)  
Paul I  
      n  
1    1754--1801, tsar of Russia (1796--1801); son of Catherine II; assassinated  
2    1901--64, king of the Hellenes (1947--64); son of Constantine I  
Pedro I  
      n   1798--1834, first emperor of Brazil (1822--31); son of John VI of Portugal: declared Brazilian independence (1822)  
Peter I  
      n   known as Peter the Great. 1672--1725, tsar of Russia (1682--1725), who assumed sole power in 1689. He introduced many reforms in government, technology, and the western European ideas. He also acquired new territories for Russia in the Baltic and founded the new capital of St Petersburg (1703)  
Philip I  
      n  
1    known as Philip the Handsome. 1478--1506, king of Castile (1506); father of Emperor Charles V and founder of the Hapsburg dynasty in Spain  
2    title of Philip II of Spain as king of Portugal  
p-i-n  
      abbrev. for   p-type, intrinsic, n-type: a form of construction of semiconductor devices  
Ptolemy I  
      n   called Ptolemy Soter. ?367--283 b.c., king of Egypt (323--285 b.c.), a general of Alexander the Great, who obtained Egypt on Alexander's death and founded the Ptolemaic dynasty: his capital Alexandria became the centre of Greek culture  
Richard I  
      n   nicknamed Coeur de Lion or the Lion-Heart. 1157--99, king of England (1189--99); a leader of the third crusade (joining it in 1191). On his way home, he was captured in Austria (1192) and held to ransom. After a brief return to England, where he was crowned again (1194), he spent the rest of his life in France  
Robert I  
      n   known as Robert the Bruce. 1274--1329, king of Scotland (1306--29): he defeated the English army of Edward II at Bannockburn (1314) and gained recognition of Scotland's independence (1328)  
Rudolf I   , Rudolph I         
      n   1218--91, king of Germany (1273--91): founder of the Hapsburg dynasty based on the duchies of Styria and Austria  
Seleucus I  
      n   surname Nicator. ?358--280 b.c., Macedonian general under Alexander the Great, who founded the Seleucid kingdom  
Sesostris I  
      n   20th century b.c., king of Egypt of the 12th dynasty. He conquered Nubia and brought ancient Egypt to the height of its prosperity. The funerary complex at Lisht was built during his reign  
Suleiman I   , Soliman, Solyman  
      n   called the Magnificent. ?1495--1566, sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1520--66), whose reign was noted for its military power and cultural achievements  
Suppiluliumas I  
      n   king of the Hittites (?1375--?1335 b.c.); founder of the Hittite empire  
Theodore I  
      n   called Lascaris. ?1175--1222, Byzantine ruler, who founded a Byzantine state in exile at Nicaea after Constantinople fell to the Crusaders (1204)  
Theodosius I  
      n   called the Great. ?346--395 a.d., Roman emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire (379--95) and of the Western Roman Empire (392--95)  
Thutmose I  
      n   died c. 1500 b.c., king of Egypt of the 18th dynasty, who extended his territory in Nubia and Syria and enlarged the Temple of Amon at Karnak  
t.i.d.     (in prescriptions)  
      abbrev. for   ter in die  
     (Latin: three times a day)  
Tiglath-pileser I  
      n   king of Assyria (?1116--?1093 b.c.), who extended his kingdom to the upper Euphrates and defeated the king of Babylonia  
type I error  
      n     (Statistics)   the error of rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true, the probability of which is the significance level of a result  
Umberto I     (Italian)  
      n   1844--1900, king of Italy (1878--1900); son of Victor Emmanuel II: assassinated at Monza  
Valdemar I   , II, IV     (Danish)  
      n   a variant spelling of Waldemar I, II or IV  
Valentinian I   , Valentinianus I  
      n   321--375 a.d., emperor of the Western Roman Empire (364--375); appointed his brother Valens to rule the Eastern Empire  
Waldemar I   , Valdemar I         
      n   known as Waldemar the Great. 1131--82, king of Denmark (1157--82). He conquered the Wends (1169), increased the territory of Denmark, and established the hereditary rule of his line  
Wilhelm I  
      n      the German name of       William I       5  
Wilhelmina I     (Dutch)  
      n   1880--1962, queen of the Netherlands from 1890 until her abdication (1948) in favour of her daughter Juliana  
William I  
      n  
1    known as William the Conqueror. ?1027--1087, duke of Normandy (1035--87) and king of England (1066--87). He claimed to have been promised the English crown by Edward the Confessor, after whose death he disputed the succession of Harold II, invading England in 1066 and defeating Harold at Hastings. The conquest of England resulted in the introduction to England of many Norman customs, esp. feudalism. In 1085 he ordered the Domesday Book to be compiled  
2    known as William the Bad. 1120--66, Norman king of Sicily (1154--66)  
3    known as William the Silent. 1533--84, prince of Orange and count of Nassau: led the revolt of the Netherlands against Spain (1568--76) and became first stadholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands (1579--84); assassinated  
4    1772--1843, king of the Netherlands (1815--40): abdicated in favour of his son William II  
5    German name Wilhelm I. 1797--1888, king of Prussia (1861--88) and first emperor of Germany (1871--88)  
World War I  
      n   the war (1914--18), fought mainly in Europe and the Middle East, in which the Allies (principally France, Russia, Britain, Italy after 1915, and the U.S. after 1917) defeated the Central Powers (principally Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Turkey). The war was precipitated by the assassination of Austria's crown prince (Archduke Franz Ferdinand) at Sarajevo on June 28, 1914 and swiftly developed its major front in E France, where millions died in static trench warfare. After the October Revolution (1917) the Bolsheviks ended Russian participation in the war (Dec. 15, 1917). The exhausted Central Powers agreed to an armistice on Nov. 11, 1918 and quickly succumbed to internal revolution, before being forced to sign the Treaty of Versailles (June 28, 1919) and other treaties,   (Also called)    First World War, Great War  
Wu-lu-mu-ch'i  
      n      a variant of       Urumchi  
Xerxes I  
      n   ?519--465 b.c., king of Persia (485--465), who led a vast army against Greece. His forces were victorious at Thermopylae but his fleet was defeated at Salamis (480) and his army at Plataea (479)  
Zog I  
      n   1895--1961, king of Albania (1928--39), formerly prime minister (1922--24) and president (1925--28). He allowed Albania to become dominated by Fascist Italy and fled into exile when Mussolini invaded (1939)  

Diccionario de inglés definición  

Consulte también:

I, I, I, -i

idgaf abbr. acron.
I don't give a fuck

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O Regístrese/conéctese en Reverso

Diccionario colaborativo     Inglés Definiciones
abbr. acron.
Short for "I love you".
[Fam.]
abbr. acron.
Short for "today I learned".
[Fam.];[Slang] When you learn about information that isn’t new but is novel for you, share it with the world by adding a “TIL”.
abbr. acron.
Short for "I don't know".
[Fam.]
n.
Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations"
exp.
I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it
exp.
me too
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